What is IPM?

Integrated Pest Management (IPM) is a long-term management strategy that uses a combination of tactics to reduce pests to tolerable levels with potentially lower costs for the pest manager and minimal effect on the environment. The principles of Integrated Pest Management include:

  • Identify pests, their hosts and beneficial organisms before taking action.
  • Establish monitoring guidelines for each pest species.
  • Establish an action threshold for the pest.
  • Evaluate and implement control tactics.
  • Monitor, evaluate and document the results.

IPM can be applied when managing all kinds of pests, including insects, weeds, diseases and vertebrate pests, such as ground squirrels and pigeons. It integrates prevention, cultural practices, mechanical and/or physical pest controls, biological pest controls and chemical pest controls to prevent and suppress pests. The goal of IPM is to reduce the adverse impacts of pest control on human health, the environment and non-target organisms, while managing pests effectively.

The concept of Integrated Pest Management is not new and has been used on field crops and orchards throughout the world. Applying it in urban environments, including home gardens, landscapes and golf courses, presents special challenges. Urban IPM, or pest management programs that incorporate reduced use of pesticides in private and commercial landscapes, golf courses and other urban landscape settings, is a rapidly expanding field that incorporates university and industry research.

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Green Industry Professional’s Guide to Integrated Pest Management (IPM)
A Green Industry Professional’s Guide to Integrated Pest Management is designed to help green industry personnel understand IPM and to aid in implementing a pest control plan.
Hefner, M., Kratsch, H. 2017, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension SP-17-14
Insect Management
Applying IPM strategies: Insect control can be split into these five separate categories.
Hefner, M. 2019, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno. IP
Kids Know Nevada Insects: Monarch Butterfly
I am the monarch butterfly! I am found all throughout the United States and even southern Canada. I am most well-known for the yearly trip back and forth (called a migration) that I make every fall and spring. Monarchs in Nevada and other western states head to the coast of California, but those in the east head all the way to central Mexico. When we arrive, we hang from trees in big numbers, waiting until spring to head north. We do this to avoid cold weather, returning in spring when the plants we need begin to grow again.
Burls, K. and Newton, J. 2017, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, FS-17-14
scottish thistle
Nevada Nuisance Weeds Field Guide
The plants listed in this field guide are nuisance weeds, those that are troublesome, but have not been listed by the state as noxious weeds.
Hefner, M., Kratsch, H. 2018, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension SP-18-02
Pets and Pesticide Use
Pets are an important part of our lives. The animals that share our homes, yards and properties rely on us for protection and safety. Some pesticide products used in and around our homes, in our yards and on our lawns can harm our pets and other domestic animals if not used properly.
Donaldson, S., Hefner, M., and Moses, C. 2010, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, FS-10-06
Plant Disease Management
Plant disease management, like most pest management, is based on several important principles. These are the basic principles of plant disease management
Hefner, M. 2019, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno. IP
Principles of Integrated Pest Management (IPM)
An outline of the principles and best practices of Integrated Pest Management (IPM)
Hefner, M. 2019, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno. IP
Russian Knapweed Control Trial 2013-2015, Pershing County
A document of effective ways to maintain and control Russian Knapweed crops.
Foster, S., and Schultz, B. 2016, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, PS-16-04
Tips for a Healthy Lawn
Follow these tips to conserve water, crowd out weeds, and grow a thick, green lawn.
Hefner, M. 2019, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno. IP
Tips for Building a Healthy Soil
Soil is the foundation for your plants. Focus on building a healthy soil, and your plants will benefit.
Hefner, M. 2019, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno. IP
Tips for Healthy Landscape Trees
A mature tree adds value, shade and beauty to the landscape. Keep trees healthy by following these tips:
Hefner, M. 2019, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno. IP
Tips for Lower-risk Pest Control
Products are available that have less risk to the user and others. Select these whenever appropriate.
Hefner, M. 2019, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, IP
Tips for Managing Insect Pests in the Landscape
Did you know that 99% of all insects are not harmful to you or your landscape? Determine which insects are helpful and head head off insect pests by following these tips:
Hefner, M. 2019, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno. IP.
Tips for Managing Weeds
Use these tips to manage weeds and grow healthy, thriving plants in your yard
Hefner, M. 2019, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno. IP
Tips for Using Pesticides Safely
Remember, pesticides are designed to kill or repel pests. Keep yourself, your family and your pets safe by following these tips.
Hefner, M. 2019, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno. IP
Vertebrate Pest Management
Vertebrate pests include animals with a backbone, such as ground squirrels, mice and pigeons.
Hefner, M. 2019, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno. IP
Viewpoint: An alternative Management Paradigm for Plant Communities Affected by Invasive Annual Grasses in the Intermountain West.
Today’s landscapes are not those described in 1860. With over 400,000 km2 colonized by cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) and other annual grasses, we believe it is time to declare: The pristine-management-paradigm has failed. Continued, wholesale application of this concept is misguided.
Perryman, B. L., Schultz, B. W., Mcadoo, J. K., Alverts, B., Cervantes, J. C., Foster, S., McCuin, G., Swanson, S. R. 2018, Rangelands, 40(3)
Weed Management
As with all pest management, it is essential to identify the pest before taking action. Most effective weed management plans include several control strategies. Weed control can be divided into five separate categories.
Hefner, M. 2019, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno. IP