Featured Programs

Nevada Radon Education Program personnel, Susan Howe and Nadia Noel

Nevada Radon Education Program

The Nevada Radon Education Program is a partnership with the Nevada Division of Public and Behavioral Health to educate Nevadans about the health risk posed by elevated levels of radon in the home. The Extension program offers literature, educational presentations and low cost radon test kits in many county Extension and partner offices.

heifers grazing in field

Herds & Harvest Program - Nevada Beginning Farmer and Rancher Project

Developing educational courses, workshops, technical assistance, business advice and mentoring support network for Nevada agricultural producers who are beginning or diversify a farm or ranch operation.

heart and shield cb

Heart & Shield: Rural Domestic Violence Prevention Program

Program works to promote resiliency, strengthen positive future relationships and stop the domestic violence cycle

Excerpts from our latest newsletter

 

Nevada Field Day provides hands-on activities and demonstrations

University experts showcase research, activities and programs at fall festival

By Claudene Wharton

two women at field day giving a thumbs-up
Nevada Field Day on Oct. 19 features education and fun for people of all ages. Photo by Robert Moore.

At Nevada Field Day on Oct. 19, visitors will be treated to a variety of free activities and giveaways, and even some tasty food samples, courtesy of the University of Nevada, Reno and its College of Agriculture, Biotechnology & Natural Resources.

As part of this year’s activities, acclaimed local food advocate and Chef Clint Jolly will be performing a cooking demonstration at 11 a.m. with produce from the University’s Desert Farming Initiative and meat from the University’s Wolf Pack Meats. Jolly is a former winner of Food Network’s Chopped: Impossible Restaurant Challenge, and is currently a meat and seafood specialist with Sysco Foodservice.

Nevada Field Day features hands-on activities and information focusing on the latest advancements in agriculture, horticulture, nutrition, natural resources and the environment. It will be held 9 a.m. to 3 p.m., at the University’s Main Station Field Lab, 5895 Clean Water Way in Reno, near the intersection of McCarran Boulevard and Mill Street. It is a collaborative project of the College of Agriculture, Biotechnology & Natural Resources; and its research and outreach units, the Experiment Station and University of Nevada, Reno Extension.

This year’s Field Day will feature over 45 booths and activities

For over 60 years, University students and faculty have used the Main Station Field Lab to provide education and research, not only on raising and processing healthy cattle, but also on a variety of other important issues, including controlling noxious weeds, developing alternative low-water-use crops, and preserving air and water quality.

 

Photo Gallery | Youth compete at Nevada 4-H Expo

University of Nevada, Reno Extension brings back State Expo after hiatus

At the Nevada 4-H Expo, held Oct. 3-6 at the Winnemucca Events Complex in Winnemucca, 179 youth showed and competed in several categories, including raising and showing various animals, communications, photography, food science and nutrition, robotics, computer science, and many more categories. According to organizers, this once-annual event in Nevada has been sorely missed in its absence for several years.

To find out more about local 4-H activities and clubs, as well as National 4-H Week activities and the Nevada 4-H Expo Competition, contact your county’s Extension office.

A 4-H student showing a pig

MattieRose J., from Humboldt County, shows her pig at the 2019 Nevada 4-H Expo in Winnemucca. Photo by Dianna Walker.

A 4-H student in a wheelchair shooting an arrow

Lindsay C., from Douglas County, competes in archery at the 2019 Nevada 4-H Expo in Winnemucca. Photo by Dianna Walker.

4-H students showing dogs

Kara H., from Carson City, shows her dog at the 2019 Nevada 4-H Expo in Winnemucca. Photo by Dianna Walker.

4-H student holding a guinea pig

Amy B., from Lander County, shows her guinea pig at the 2019 Nevada 4-H Expo in Winnemucca. Photo by Dianna Walker.

4-H student with a black rabbit

Ira D., from Humboldt County, shows his rabbit at the 2019 Nevada 4-H Expo in Winnemucca. Photo by Dianna Walker.

4-H students working with colored flash cards

Siblings Julianna and Joey S., from Humboldt County, participate in a workshop on how to engage an audience at the 2019 Nevada 4-H Expo in Winnemucca. Photo by Dianna Walker.

A quilted pillow and several sewing projects with award ribbons

4-H students competed in several craft and artisan goods competitions, including sewing, at the 2019 Nevada 4-H Expo in Winnemucca. Photo by Dianna Walker.

A girl riding a horse jumping over a hurdle

Makayla L., from Humboldt County, competes with her horse at the 2019 Nevada 4-H Expo in Winnemucca. Photo by Robert Moore.

A boy safely loading the barrel of a muzzleloader

Hudson J., from White Pine County, safely loads his muzzleloader as part of the shooting sports competition at the 2019 Nevada 4-H Expo in Winnemucca. Photo by Dianna Walker.

Five 4-H girls showing their fashions

From left to right: Justine M., Ellie S., Emily H., Grace H. and Mesa J., all from Elko County, compete in the Fashion Revue at the 2019 Nevada 4-H Expo in Winnemucca. Photo by Dianna Walker.

News Articles, Fact Sheets, Reports...

Fact Sheets
The Medical Cost of Domestic Violence Powell, C., Powell, P., and Baker-Tingey, J. 2018, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Domestic Violence’s Effect on Children
Children don’t have to be victims of domestic violence to suffer from it. Simply witnessing violence (seeing or hearing it) can damage a child’s ability to connect with and trust others, preventing them from building the crucial relationships they need to succeed to their fullest potential.
Baker-Tingey, J., Powell, C., and Powell, P. 2017, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, Fact Sheet 17-06
Little Free Libraries in Nevada: What, Why and How
LFLs are small, custom-built freestanding boxes that house anywhere from 20 to 100 books. LFLs are often uniquely designed (typically very cute) and can be made of any material able to withstand the outdoor elements. Finding a suitable location for the LFL is an important decision.
Bender, P., Burge, P., Powell, P., and Rebori M. 2015, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, Fact Sheet-15-09
What is a Food Desert?
If a desert is a place where water is hard to find, a food desert is an area where healthy food is hard to come by. Having healthy foods in one’s immediate neighborhood from places such as stores, farmers markets or community gardens influences one’s food choices and what one eats.
Spears, K., Powell, P. and Kim, W. Y. 2014, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, Fact Sheet-14-05
Early Detection and Rapid Response (EDRR) Education and Implementation Results in Nevada
Traditionally, new weed invasions are not detected or addressed until they are so dense and widespread that eradication is not feasible. Early Detection and Rapid Response (EDRR) is an approach to weed control that emphasizes controlling new, invading weeds while the populations are localized and small.
Newton, J., Davison, J., Schultz, B., Blecker, L., and Creech, E. 2013, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Integrated Weed Management in and around Established Alfalfa Fields
Many weeds are less palatable or nutritious for livestock than alfalfa, or are toxic. Weeds establish in alfalfa when the alfalfa is both growing and dormant. This fact sheet is intended to facilitate management decisions that reduce economic losses in established alfalfa due to weed pests.
Blecker, L., Davison, J., Schultz, B., and Newton, J. 2012, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
The Potential of Amaranth as a New Crop for Nevada
Amaranth originated in South America and has been cultivated for centuries. It is grown as a high quality, gluten-free grain, and occasionally used as a leafy vegetable as well. While the seeds are sold as a grain, it is a broad-leaved plant and not a grass as are most grains.
Davison, J. and Leger, E. 2012, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Non-Chemical Weed Control for Small Acreage Farmers in Nevada
Many small acreage farming operations are organic-based or strongly prefer weed management recommendations that preclude the use of conventional herbicides. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide basic information and resources on non-chemical weed control options for these small acreage farmers.
Davison, J. and Newton, J. 2012, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Needs Assessment for Noxious Weeds in Churchill County: Part 4 of 5-Criteria for Herbicide Use and Selection
This fact sheet is the fourth in a series of five that reports the results of a needs assessment survey completed by faculty in University of Nevada Cooperative Extension (UNCE). The survey attempted to identify the major issues related to the management and control of weeds in Nevada.
Davison, J., Powell, P., Schultz, B., and Singletary, L. 2012, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Needs Assessment for Noxious Weeds in Churchill County: Part 5 of 5-Priority Research and Outreach
This fact sheet is the fifth in a series of five that reports the results of a needs assessment survey completed by faculty in University of Nevada Cooperative Extension (UNCE). The survey attempted to identify the major issues related to the management and control of weeds in Nevada.
Davison, J., Powell, P., Schultz, B., and Singletary, L. 2012, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Integrated Weed Management in Seedling Alfalfa
Seedling alfalfa is vulnerable to weed competition because seedlings grow slowly and do not compete well with weeds. Weed competition in new alfalfa stands impedes root development and lowers forage quality and alfalfa yield. The damage caused to seedling alfalfa can last the life of the stand.
Blecker, L., Creech, E., and Davison, J. 2011, Integrated Weed Management in Seedling Alfalfa
Response of Teff Grain Yields to Several Broadleaf Herbicides Applied at Three Different Growth Stages During 2009
Teff (Eragrostis tef (Zuccagni) Trotter) is a self-pollinated, annual, warm season grass that is used throughout the world as grain for human consumption and as forage for livestock. Teff is an ancient grain that was believed to have been domesticated in Ethiopia between 4000 and 1000 BC.
Creech, E., Davison, J., and Laca, M. 2010, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Biomass Production of 15 Teff Varieties Grown in Churchill County, Nevada During 2009
The amount of teff produced in the United States is increasing rapidly due to the plant’s popularity as an especially nutritious grain and as high-quality horse hay. The word teff means “lost” because teff seed is the smallest grain in the world, and if you drop it on the ground it will be lost.
Davison, J. and Laca, M. 2010, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Grain Production of 15 Teff Varieties Grown in Churchill County, Nevada During 2009
The amount of teff produced in the United States is increasing rapidly due to the plant’s popularity as an especially nutritious grain and as high-quality, horse hay. The word teff means “lost” because teff seed is the smallest grain in the world and if you drop it on the ground it will be lost.
Davison, J. and Laca, M. 2010, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Response of Teff Biomass Yields to Several Broadleaf Herbicides Applied at Three Different Growth Stages During 2009
Teff Eragrostis tef (Zucc.) Trotter is a selfpollinated, annual, warm season grass that is used throughout the world as grain for human consumption and as forage for livestock. The amount of teff produced in the United States is increasing rapidly due to its popularity as a nutritious grain and high quality, horse hay.
Creech, E., Davison, J., and Laca, M. 2009, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Observations of Commercial Tef Production in Nevada During 2006
Nevada Cooperative Extension fact sheet FS-04-51 discusses tef uses, adaptations and recommended agronomic practices in detail. It also provides information on the results of the 2003 tef demonstration trial efforts.
Davison, J. 2006, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
A Homeowner’s Guide to Cheatgrass
Cheatgrass, also known as downy brome and bronco grass, is an annual plant native to Europe and Asia. Cheatgrass has a serious environmental impact on Nevada. It dries out very quickly, becoming extremely flammable. This increases the occurrence and intensity of fires in sagebrush areas.
Davison, J. and Smith, E. 2006, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
TEF Demonstration Planting Results for 2005 Jay Davison, Area Specialist, Alternative Crops and Forage University of Nevada, Cooperative Extension
Nevada Cooperative Extension Fact Sheet-04-51 discuses Tef uses, adaptations and recommended agronomic practices in detail. It also provides information on the results of the 2003 Tef demonstration trial efforts. Fact Sheet-05-28 describes the results of the 2004 Tef trial.
Davison, J. 2005, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Churchill County Alfalfa Hay Establishment, Production Costs and Returns, 2004
This publication is intended to be a guid, used to make production decisions, determine potential returns, and prepare business and marketing plans. Practices described are based on the production practices considered typical for this crop and region, but may not apply to every situation.
Curtis, K., Davison, J., MacDougall, B., and Riggs, W. 2004, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Tef Demonstration Planting Results for 2004
Nevada Cooperative Extension fact sheet #04-51 discuses tef uses, adaptations and recommended agronomic practices in detail. It also provides information on the results of the 2003 tef demonstration trial efforts. This fact sheet describes the results of the 2004 trial.
Davison, J. 2004, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Testing Seaberry as an Alternative Crop in Nevada
This fact sheet discusses one of several crops currently being tested in Extension’s Alternative Crop Testing program.
Davison, J. and Riggs, W. 2004, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Tef Demonstration Planting Results for 2003
Information regarding Tef (Eragrostis tef) and data from a demonstration in 2003.
Davison, J. and McKnight, C. 2003, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Evaluating the Potential of an Alternative Crop
This fact sheet provides guidance concerning the most critical questions that must be answered by a producer before an alternative crop is planted.
Davison, J. 2002, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
The Potential for Soybean Production In Western Nevada
The purpose of the project was to complete a preliminary un-replicated evaluation of the survival and production potential of soybeans in western Nevada.
Davison, J. 2002, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Scentless Chamomile: Taxonomy, Ecology, and Control
Corn or scentless chamomile (Anthemis arvensis L.) is an annual flowering plant (forb) native to much of Europe, parts of Northern Africa, and Asia. It has become naturalized in North America, southern Africa, Australia, and New Zealand.
Davison, J. and Schultz, B. 2002, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Special Publications
2016 Alfalfa Variety Trial in Western Nevada, Initial Results
Alfalfa is the most extensive crop in Nevada. The majority of alfalfa fields in western Nevada are harvested three to four times annually. This production system is dependent on dormant alfalfa varieties that cease growth during the winter months. These types of alfalfa varieties can be classified according to fall dormancy and winter survival ratings. In western Nevada the most commonly planted alfalfa varieties have a fall dormancy rating of 4 to 5 with an occasional 6. Yet, these varieties are normally very winter hardy, with ratings of 1 to 2. The alfalfa varieties evaluated in this study included one fall dormancy rating 3, eight with a fall dormancy rating of 4, six with a fall dormancy rating of 5 and one with a fall dormancy rating of 6. All of the tested alfalfa varieties produced heavy yields in this evaluation. Producers reviewing these results should look at relative yields of each variety in combination with other factors.
Davison, J., Solomon, J. and Lawry, T. 2016, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
fast food
Results From a Workplace Health and Wellness Program
In March 2013, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension received a grant to develop, implement and evaluate a six month pilot Workplace Health and Wellness program for employees at a local business. The program was to be delivered between April 1, 2013 and September 30, 2013.
Powell, P. 2016, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, Special Publication-16-05
Report to Community on Volunteer Forum: Fallon, Nevada
The contents of this report include the information and thoughts about the community as seen from the perspective of these participants. This report is not intended to be a comprehensive picture of the entire area, but merely a snapshot as provided by those in attendance.
Powell, P., Rebori, M., and Wright, J. 2016, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, Special Publication 16-08
Spring and Winter Canola Variety Trial Results in Nevada
Canola is an annual plant grown for its seed that originated from plants known as rapeseed. It is part of the Brassica plant family which includes mustard, cabbage, broccoli and cauliflower. The seed is crushed to produce oil, with the remaining meal used as livestock feed.
Davison, J. 2015, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Evaluation of Several Tomato Varieties’ Resistance to Beet Curly Top Virus Grown Under High Tunnels and in the Field
The purpose of the project was to test two hypotheses: 1) Incidence of Beet Curly Top Virus (BCTV) is reduced in organic fresh market tomatoes grown under high tunnels, and 2) The use of locally developed BCTV-resistant plants reduces the incidence of BCTV in high-tunnel and field-grown organic fresh market tomatoes.
Davison, J., and Lattin, R. 2015, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Corn Variety Trial 2012, Pershing County
Alfalfa hay remains by far the most important crop, in terms of both acres harvested and value of production (Foster 2010). Small grains typically are grown for hay and are a rotational crop during the year(s) after an alfalfa field has been removed and when it is replanted.
Foster, S., and Davison, J. 2012, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Northwestern Nevada Teff Production Costs and Returns, 2008
This publication is intended to be a guide used to make production decisions, determine potential returns, and prepare business and marketing plans. Practices described are based on the production practices considered typical for this crop and region, but may not apply to every situation.
Bishop, C., Curtis, K., and Davison, J. 2008, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension

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