Featured Programs

Nevada Radon Education Program personnel, Susan Howe and Nadia Noel

Nevada Radon Education Program

The Nevada Radon Education Program is a partnership with the Nevada Division of Public and Behavioral Health to educate Nevadans about the health risk posed by elevated levels of radon in the home. The Extension program offers literature, educational presentations and low cost radon test kits in many county Extension and partner offices.

heifers grazing in field

Herds & Harvest Program - Nevada Beginning Farmer and Rancher Project

Developing educational courses, workshops, technical assistance, business advice and mentoring support network for Nevada agricultural producers who are beginning or diversify a farm or ranch operation.

flying radio controlled drones

Churchill County 4-H Youth Development

4-H club programming in Churchill County covers several project areas that teach leadership, life skills and citizenship.

 

Excerpts for our latest newsletter

Nevada 4-H youth and families provide over 2,000 face masks for their communities

Extension called upon by those helping to manage the COVID-19 crisis

Claudene Wharton

 

When the Elko County Emergency Operations Center put in a call to their local University of Nevada, Reno Extension office saying they needed face masks, Extension’s 4-H youth and their families swung into action, making masks not only for the Operations Center, but also for their local School District nutrition services workers who are helping to serve lunches to students who receive free and reduced meals. Similarly, 4-H youth and their families in White Pine County were early responders to the need for masks, and have now made hundreds of masks for the William Bee Ririe Hospital and Rural Health Clinic in Ely.

Once the word got out that 4-Hers were helping to make masks, more requests started coming in.

“I’d say that requests are coming in faster than our 4-H members can sew,” said Jill Baker-Tingey, Extension educator in Elko County.

After these early efforts in Elko and Ely, Nevada 4-H launched a statewide service project to help provide face masks for all Nevada communities. Now, more than 2,000 masks have been provided by 4-H across Nevada, spanning 10 counties, from Reno to Las Vegas, and from Carson City to Elko. The face masks have been donated to hospitals, hospices, health clinics, tribal healthcare, senior centers, emergency operations centers, school districts, state parole offices, and other collaborative mask-making projects.

In addition, over 100 other PPE-related items have been provided by the 4-H service project, including scrub hats, surgical gowns and ear bands/savers, which prevent ear strain and irritation for those wearing masks for extended periods.

Carrie Stark, Nevada 4-H program director with Extension, said, "The whole 4-H community has pitched in – our 4-H youth and their families, as well as 4-H alumni and volunteers."

Catch a falling star ... literally

How to collect micrometeorites in your own backyard in August

Don Deever

Timelapse of the Perseid Meteor Shower over the Black Rock DesertCatch a falling star this August using only a basin of water, a plastic cup, a magnet and a paper plate. Photo by Trevor Bexon.

Every year, there are nine meteor showers that are rated as "Class 1" events. These showers are the are most exciting to see and produce particles that fall from the sky that anyone can catch. The Perseid meteor shower is generally considered to be the finest meteor shower of the year. It is renowned for displaying up to 100 "shooting stars" per hour.

This year, the shower is predicted to peak Aug. 11-13, so mark your calendars now and gather a few simple supplies to prepare to "catch a falling star." It's a simple, yet exciting, science project a child of any age can enjoy. Gazing upon these extraterrestrial visitors brings lasting memories and connects Earth-bound mortals to the wonders of infinite space from our own backyards.

There’s still a whole Universe out there— reach for the stars

"I’ll be sharing this project with our 4-H youth here in Nevada, for whom Extension is continuing to provide at-home and online STEM programs, amid the COVID-19 pandemic. But, it’s an interesting and uplifting activity we can all enjoy." -Assistant Professor & Extension Educator Don Deever

University offers agricultural crop research tours at Field Day in Fallon

Research being done on drought-tolerant and salt-tolerant crops

Claudene Wharton

chickpea plantChickpeas are one of the crops being researched by Extension at the Experiment Station Fallon Research Center.
Photo by Maninder K. Walia.

Agriculture producers and others are invited to get a first-hand look at crop trials and research being conducted in northern Nevada by the University's College of Agriculture, Biotechnology & Natural Resources. Field Day in Fallon is free and open to the public, and will take place 9:30-10:30 a.m., Aug. 12, at the College Experiment Station’s Fallon Research Center, 2053 Schurz Highway, as well as at two local farms.

"With a limited water supply, we are always looking for drought-tolerant crops for long-term sustainability," said Maninder K. Walia, assistant professor and field crop specialist with the College's Extension unit. "We are also looking at crops in high demand that our producers are interested in growing."

The Field Day will include walking tours and discussions of crops being researched at the Experiment Station and at two local farms. The crops currently being researched at the Experiment Station include chickpeas, dry beans, and ag and forage soybeans. Walia will discuss plant traits of these crops, including early maturity, forage nutrient content, biomass production and drought tolerance.

"There has been a good deal of interest in growing hemp from local producers, so we wanted to do some crop trials based on our growing conditions here in northern Nevada," she said.

This spring, Walia also began a three-year butternut squash crop trial at Rick Lattin’s Lattin Farms. There were four varieties planted in mid-May. The varieties are being evaluated in terms of quality, taste, consumer demand, ability to grow in Nevada’s climate and overall yield.

"There is a high demand from casinos in particular for butternut squash," Walia said. "They use it for soup and other recipes."

At the Field Day, Walia will also discuss opportunities to partner with the University to develop new cropping systems adapted to northern Nevada.

Fallon Field Day on, Nevada Field Day off

Due to continued uncertainty surrounding the novel coronavirus, we have made the difficult decision to cancel the 2020 Nevada Field Day. Held each fall in Reno, this event showcases the teaching, research and outreach of our College and its Experiment Station and Extension units. We will miss this opportunity to inform and interact with the members of our community, but feel this is the best decision to protect the health and safety of Nevadans. Please visit the coronavirus information page for ongoing updates from the University of Nevada, Reno.

If you would like to keep up to date on the happenings of our College, please subscribe to our newsletter.

Thank you for your continued interest in our College and its work, and we look forward to seeing you at Nevada Field Day in 2021.

Sincerely,

Bill Payne,
Dean of the College

Expanding knowledge for Nevada

"Extension is working to bring University and Experiment Station research to our communities to enhance people’s lives. One portion of my job is to determine needs or issues related to crops and resource use within our state and work to address those needs. I invite your input on these needs." -Assistant Professor & Extension Specialist Maninder Walia

Assistant professor conducts research on water management for Nevada climate

Manuel Alejandro Andrade-Rodriguez joins College of Agriculture, Biotechnology & Natural Resources

Hannah Alfaro

Manuel Alejandro Andrade RodriguezManuel Alejandro Andrade-Rodriguez is working to help farmers more efficiently irrigate crops in Nevada’s harsh climates. Photo by Robert Moore, Extension.

University of Nevada, Reno’s College of Agriculture, Biotechnology & Natural Resources welcomes new Assistant Professor Manuel Alejandro Andrade-Rodriguez to the Department of Agriculture, Veterinary & Rangeland Sciences and the Environmental Sciences Interdisciplinary Graduate Program.

Andrade-Rodriguez is investigating how to improve irrigation management in Nevada’s arid and semi-arid climates. With the state’s harsh weather and low precipitation, conservation and proper use of water is essential for successful crops. As part of the College’s Experiment Station, he is working to develop methods to help farmers know when to water their crops and how much water they need. Andrade-Rodriguez is also focusing on using different types of sensing systems, such as weather-, soil- and plant-sensing systems, and artificial intelligence to develop technologies that will help farmers know the most efficient way to irrigate crops.

His research will save water and improve how we irrigate crops

"Working at the University so far has been great, and my colleagues have been supportive of my research. We’ve been able to collaborate on different projects, and I’m excited to get back to my office and to the field." -Assistant Professor Manuel Alejandro Andrade-Rodriguez

Churchill County Related News Articles, Fact Sheets, Reports...

 
A Collaborative Domestic Violence Prevention Program
This factsheet contains a collection of programs to prevent domestic violence and two-day training for law enforcement to understand the many issues surrounding domestic violence.
Powell, P., Smith, M., Riley, J., Harmon, A., Ryan, C., and Butler, J. 2010, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, FS-10-74
A bundle of golden Crested Wheatgrass in a dry field.
A Homeowner's Guide to Planting Crested Wheatgrass
The following description for planting crested wheatgrass applies to homeowners seeding relatively small areas (less than two acres) and who do not have access to specialized rangeland seeding equipment. For larger planting efforts, contact your local University of Nevada Cooperative Extension office for suggestions.
Smith, E., Davison, J., Carlos, B. 1999, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, FS-99-96
cheatgrass
A Homeowner’s Guide to Cheatgrass
Cheatgrass, also known as downy brome and bronco grass, is an annual plant native to Europe and Asia. Cheatgrass has a serious environmental impact on Nevada. It dries out very quickly, becoming extremely flammable. This increases the occurrence and intensity of fires in sagebrush areas.
Davison, J. and Smith, E. 2006, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Alfalfa Variety Trial in Western Nevada, Initial Results
Alfalfa is the most extensive crop in Nevada. The majority of alfalfa fields in western Nevada are harvested three to four times annually. This production system is dependent on dormant alfalfa varieties that cease growth during the winter months. These types of alfalfa varieties can be classified according to fall dormancy and winter survival ratings. In western Nevada the most commonly planted alfalfa varieties have a fall dormancy rating of 4 to 5 with an occasional 6. Yet, these varieties are normally very winter hardy, with ratings of 1 to 2. The alfalfa varieties evaluated in this study included one fall dormancy rating 3, eight with a fall dormancy rating of 4, six with a fall dormancy rating of 5 and one with a fall dormancy rating of 6. All of the tested alfalfa varieties produced heavy yields in this evaluation. Producers reviewing these results should look at relative yields of each variety in combination with other factors.
Davison, J., Solomon, J. and Lawry, T. 2016, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Biomass Production of 15 Teff Varieties Grown in Churchill County, Nevada During 2009
The amount of teff produced in the United States is increasing rapidly due to the plant’s popularity as an especially nutritious grain and as high-quality horse hay. The word teff means “lost” because teff seed is the smallest grain in the world, and if you drop it on the ground it will be lost.
Davison, J. and Laca, M. 2010, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Churchill County Alfalfa Hay Establishment, Production Costs and Returns, 2004
This publication is intended to be a guid, used to make production decisions, determine potential returns, and prepare business and marketing plans. Practices described are based on the production practices considered typical for this crop and region, but may not apply to every situation.
Curtis, K., Davison, J., MacDougall, B., and Riggs, W. 2004, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Corn Variety Trial 2012, Pershing County
Alfalfa hay remains by far the most important crop, in terms of both acres harvested and value of production (Foster 2010). Small grains typically are grown for hay and are a rotational crop during the year(s) after an alfalfa field has been removed and when it is replanted.
Foster, S., and Davison, J. 2012, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Domestic Violence: An Overview
The purpose of this publication is to help readers understand the dynamics of IPV, by providing an overview of various forms of control exhibited toward victims. As Nevada nortoriously ranks high in reports of IPV, understanding how IPV impacts our communities is crucial in developing strategies to address it.
Powell, P. 2011, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, FS-11-76
Domestic Violence’s Effect on Children
Children don’t have to be victims of domestic violence to suffer from it. Simply witnessing violence (seeing or hearing it) can damage a child’s ability to connect with and trust others, preventing them from building the crucial relationships they need to succeed to their fullest potential.
Baker-Tingey, J., Powell, C., and Powell, P. 2017, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, Fact Sheet 17-06
Early Detection and Rapid Response (EDRR) Education and Implementation Results in Nevada
Traditionally, new weed invasions are not detected or addressed until they are so dense and widespread that eradication is not feasible. Early Detection and Rapid Response (EDRR) is an approach to weed control that emphasizes controlling new, invading weeds while the populations are localized and small.
Newton, J., Davison, J., Schultz, B., Blecker, L., and Creech, E. 2013, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Emergency Preparedness and The Tabletop Exercise: How Youth Can Play a Part in the Process
This fact sheet contains information on emergency preparedness and the tabletop exercise. Learn more about how youth can play key roles in disaster training the tabletop exercise.
Powell, P., Black, L., Benesh, C., and Smith, M. 2008, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, FS-08-36
Evaluating the Potential of an Alternative Crop
This fact sheet provides guidance concerning the most critical questions that must be answered by a producer before an alternative crop is planted.
Davison, J. 2002, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Evaluation of a Domestic Violence Program for Law Enforcement
This fact sheet contains information on evaluation training methods for a domestic violence program aimed at law enforcement. This includes cadet demographics and a table that has topics used to evaluate cadet training.
Powell, P., Smith, M., Riley, J., Harmon, A., Ryan, C., and Butler, J. 2010, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, FS-10-75
Evaluation of Several Tomato Varieties’ Resistance to Beet Curly Top Virus Grown Under High Tunnels and in the Field
The purpose of the project was to test two hypotheses: 1) Incidence of Beet Curly Top Virus (BCTV) is reduced in organic fresh market tomatoes grown under high tunnels, and 2) The use of locally developed BCTV-resistant plants reduces the incidence of BCTV in high-tunnel and field-grown organic fresh market tomatoes.
Davison, J., and Lattin, R. 2015, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Grain Production of 15 Teff Varieties Grown in Churchill County, Nevada During 2009
The amount of teff produced in the United States is increasing rapidly due to the plant’s popularity as an especially nutritious grain and as high-quality, horse hay. The word teff means “lost” because teff seed is the smallest grain in the world and if you drop it on the ground it will be lost.
Davison, J. and Laca, M. 2010, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Greenstrips: Another Tool to Manage Wildfire
Greenstrips can be used to reduce the opportunity for man-caused fires to start or spread. They can reduce the size of wildfires and increase the effectiveness of the fire fighting effort, which reduces the cost. Greenstrips are also used to protect high value natural resources,
Davidson, J., Smith E. 1997, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, FS-97-36
How to help a victim of domestic violence
The purpose of this publication is to provide an overview of the difficulties victims face when leaving an abusive situation, and what we can do to help them be successful in leaving.
Powell, P. and Smith, M. 2012, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, FS-12-08
Integrated Weed Management in and around Established Alfalfa Fields
Many weeds are less palatable or nutritious for livestock than alfalfa, or are toxic. Weeds establish in alfalfa when the alfalfa is both growing and dormant. This fact sheet is intended to facilitate management decisions that reduce economic losses in established alfalfa due to weed pests.
Blecker, L., Davison, J., Schultz, B., and Newton, J. 2012, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Integrated Weed Management in Seedling Alfalfa
Seedling alfalfa is vulnerable to weed competition because seedlings grow slowly and do not compete well with weeds. Weed competition in new alfalfa stands impedes root development and lowers forage quality and alfalfa yield. The damage caused to seedling alfalfa can last the life of the stand.
Blecker, L., Creech, E., and Davison, J. 2011, Integrated Weed Management in Seedling Alfalfa
Little Free Libraries in Nevada: What, Why and How
LFLs are small, custom-built freestanding boxes that house anywhere from 20 to 100 books. LFLs are often uniquely designed (typically very cute) and can be made of any material able to withstand the outdoor elements. Finding a suitable location for the LFL is an important decision.
Bender, P., Burge, P., Powell, P., and Rebori M. 2015, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, Fact Sheet-15-09
Needs Assessment for Noxious Weeds in Churchill County: Part 1 of 5 - Problem Weeds, Approaches and Methods of Control
This publication discusses the results from a needs assessment conducted by the University of Nevada Cooperative Extension (UNCE) to identify problem weeds, the approaches and methods for control.
Davison, J., Powell, P., Schultz, B., Creech, E., and Singletary, L. 2011, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, FS-11-72
Needs Assessment for Noxious Weeds in Churchill County: Part 2 of 5 - Problems of and Obstacles to Weed Management
This publication discusses the results from a needs assessment conducted by the University of Nevada Cooperative Extension and looks at the problems and obstacles associated with weed management.
Powell, P., Davison, J., Schultz, B., Creech, E., and Singletary, L. 2011, University of Nevada Extension, FS-2011-73
Needs Assessment for Noxious Weeds in Churchill County: Part 3 of 5 - Spread, Detection and Prevention of Weeds
This publication discusses the results from a needs assessment conducted by the University of Nevada Cooperative Extension to discuss the spread, detection and prevention of weeds.
Davison, J., Powell, P., Schultz, B., Creech, E., and Singletary, L. 2011, University of Nevada Extension, FS-2011-74
Needs Assessment for Noxious Weeds in Churchill County: Part 4 of 5 - Criteria for Herbicide Use and Selection
This fact sheet is the fourth in a series of five that reports the results of a needs assessment survey completed by faculty in University of Nevada Cooperative Extension (UNCE). The survey attempted to identify the major issues related to the management and control of weeds in Nevada.
Davison, J., Powell, P., Schultz, B., and Singletary, L. 2012, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Needs Assessment for Noxious Weeds in Churchill County: Part 5 of 5 - Priority Research and Outreach
This fact sheet is the fifth in a series of five that reports the results of a needs assessment survey completed by faculty in University of Nevada Cooperative Extension (UNCE). The survey attempted to identify the major issues related to the management and control of weeds in Nevada.
Davison, J., Powell, P., Schultz, B., and Singletary, L. 2012, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Nevada (USA) range management school - Adapting an American grazing management curriculum to other continents. Schultz, B., McAdoo, K., Perryman, B., Foster, S., and Davison, J. 2015, Journal for Arid Lands Studies. 25-3: 273-276.
Non-Chemical Weed Control for Small Acreage Farmers in Nevada
Many small acreage farming operations are organic-based or strongly prefer weed management recommendations that preclude the use of conventional herbicides. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide basic information and resources on non-chemical weed control options for these small acreage farmers.
Davison, J. and Newton, J. 2012, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Northwestern Nevada Teff Production Costs and Returns, 2008
This publication is intended to be a guide used to make production decisions, determine potential returns, and prepare business and marketing plans. Practices described are based on the production practices considered typical for this crop and region, but may not apply to every situation.
Bishop, C., Curtis, K., and Davison, J. 2008, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Observations of Commercial Tef Production in Nevada During 2006
Nevada Cooperative Extension fact sheet FS-04-51 discusses tef uses, adaptations and recommended agronomic practices in detail. It also provides information on the results of the 2003 tef demonstration trial efforts.
Davison, J. 2006, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Orders of Protection: Domestic Violence
The purpose of this fact sheet is to describe what an Order of Protection is, the process followed to obtain one, and the need to report order violations.
Powell, P. and Smith, M. 2012, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, FS-12-07
Radioactivity and groundwater in the Lahontan Valley
Small amounts of radioactive elements are found in almost all soil, rock and water. Groundwater throughout the United States contains radioactivity and radioactive elements. As such, in Nevada, communities that pump groundwater for public water supply treat to remove radioactivity and other contaminants.
Walker M. and Powell P. 2011, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, FS-11-39
Report to Community on Volunteer Forum: Fallon, Nevada
The contents of this report include the information and thoughts about the community as seen from the perspective of these participants. This report is not intended to be a comprehensive picture of the entire area, but merely a snapshot as provided by those in attendance.
Powell, P., Rebori, M., and Wright, J. 2016, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, Special Publication 16-08
Response of Teff Biomass Yields to Several Broadleaf Herbicides Applied at Three Different Growth Stages During 2009
Teff Eragrostis tef (Zucc.) Trotter is a selfpollinated, annual, warm season grass that is used throughout the world as grain for human consumption and as forage for livestock. The amount of teff produced in the United States is increasing rapidly due to its popularity as a nutritious grain and high quality, horse hay.
Creech, E., Davison, J., and Laca, M. 2009, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Response of Teff Grain Yields to Several Broadleaf Herbicides Applied at Three Different Growth Stages During 2009
Teff (Eragrostis tef (Zuccagni) Trotter) is a self-pollinated, annual, warm season grass that is used throughout the world as grain for human consumption and as forage for livestock. Teff is an ancient grain that was believed to have been domesticated in Ethiopia between 4000 and 1000 BC.
Creech, E., Davison, J., and Laca, M. 2010, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
fast food
Results From a Workplace Health and Wellness Program
In March 2013, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension received a grant to develop, implement and evaluate a six month pilot Workplace Health and Wellness program for employees at a local business. The program was to be delivered between April 1, 2013 and September 30, 2013.
Powell, P. 2016, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, Special Publication-16-05
Scentless Chamomile: Taxonomy, Ecology, and Control
Corn or scentless chamomile (Anthemis arvensis L.) is an annual flowering plant (forb) native to much of Europe, parts of Northern Africa, and Asia. It has become naturalized in North America, southern Africa, Australia, and New Zealand.
Davison, J. and Schultz, B. 2002, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Spring and Winter Canola Variety Trial Results in Nevada
Canola is an annual plant grown for its seed that originated from plants known as rapeseed. It is part of the Brassica plant family which includes mustard, cabbage, broccoli and cauliflower. The seed is crushed to produce oil, with the remaining meal used as livestock feed.
Davison, J. 2015, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Tef Demonstration Planting Results (2004)
Nevada Cooperative Extension fact sheet #04-51 discuses tef uses, adaptations and recommended agronomic practices in detail. It also provides information on the results of the 2003 tef demonstration trial efforts. This fact sheet describes the results of the 2004 trial.
Davison, J. 2004, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Tef Demonstration Planting Results (2005)
Nevada Cooperative Extension Fact Sheet-04-51 discuses Tef uses, adaptations and recommended agronomic practices in detail. It also provides information on the results of the 2003 Tef demonstration trial efforts. Fact Sheet-05-28 describes the results of the 2004 Tef trial.
Davison, J. 2005, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Tef Demonstration Planting Results for 2003
Information regarding Tef (Eragrostis tef) and data from a demonstration in 2003.
Davison, J. and McKnight, C. 2003, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Testing Seaberry as an Alternative Crop in Nevada
This fact sheet discusses one of several crops currently being tested in Extension’s Alternative Crop Testing program.
Davison, J. and Riggs, W. 2004, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
The Medical Cost of Domestic Violence
What is typically igonored is the financial cost domestic violence places on society, in terms of housing, child care, employment and criminal justice services
C. Powell, P. Powell, J. Baker-Tingey 2018, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno FS-18-02
The Potential for Soybean Production In Western Nevada
The purpose of the project was to complete a preliminary un-replicated evaluation of the survival and production potential of soybeans in western Nevada.
Davison, J. 2002, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
The Potential of Amaranth as a New Crop for Nevada
Amaranth originated in South America and has been cultivated for centuries. It is grown as a high quality, gluten-free grain, and occasionally used as a leafy vegetable as well. While the seeds are sold as a grain, it is a broad-leaved plant and not a grass as are most grains.
Davison, J. and Leger, E. 2012, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Training youth to prepare communities for disasters
This fact sheet will report on a final evaluation of a two-state educational program to train older youth to educate communities about disasters and to train fellow youth in appropriate response efforts once a disaster occurs.
Powell, P. 2012, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, FS-12-09
What Grows Back After The Fire
In the aftermath of wildfire, many homeowners are alarmed by the sudden change in appearance of the wildland vegetation surrounding their homes. At this time, a frequently asked question is "Will it grow back?" This fact sheet describes the response of some common northern Nevada rangeland plants to wildfire.
Smith, E., Davidson, J. 1996, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno. FS96-40
What is a Food Desert?
If a desert is a place where water is hard to find, a food desert is an area where healthy food is hard to come by. Having healthy foods in one’s immediate neighborhood from places such as stores, farmers markets or community gardens influences one’s food choices and what one eats.
Spears, K., Powell, P. and Kim, W. Y. 2014, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, Fact Sheet-14-05
What is Obesogenic Environment?
The obesogenic environment comprises factors in our environment that support being obese. This fact sheet will define obesogenic environment.
Powell, P., Spears, K., and Rebori, M. 2010, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, FS-10-11

County Reports

 
Churchill County Annual Report | Fiscal Year 2017 - 2018
Churchill County Annual Report | July 1, 2017 - June 30, 2018
Powell, P. 2017, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno

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