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Pershing County 4-H Youth Development

Pershing County 4-H Youth Development

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Coffee Shop email helps ranchers make money

Extension’s coffee shop is a national subscription email designed to provide a two-way communication network for livestock producers. The question-and-answer service provides answers to livestock production and marketing questions.

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Pesticide Safety Education Program

Extension’s Pesticide Safety Education Program provides Web-based training for pesticide applicators seeking to apply restricted and general use pesticides safely, properly and according to the law. Pesticide licensure and certification is administered by the Nevada Department of Agriculture.

Excerpts from our latest newsletter

New Extension associate director to develop training and leadership programs

Shannon Horrillo joins the College of Agriculture, Biotechnology & Natural Resources

Hannah Alfaro

Shannon HorrilloHorrillo is the associate director of University of Nevada, Reno Extension. Photo by Robert Moore.

University of Nevada, Reno Extension welcomes Shannon Horrillo to their staff as associate director.

Horrillo, along with providing primary support to Ivory W. Lyles, the director of Extension, will develop training and leadership programs for new faculty and be the primary communication link between faculty and the community. She will also be charged with providing leadership for effective programming and finding new grant and funding opportunities for Extension programs.

“A key component of Horrillo’s responsibilities will also be developing an accountability system,” said Lyles. “This is so effective communication of program impact can be achieved for Extension, federal, state and county partners.”

Shannon will help create high-quality programs with significant impacts on Nevada

“I’m looking forward to working with both Extension faculty and the community. I’m also excited to provide leadership for new programs and represent Extension at all levels.” - Horrillo

 

Laughlin-Searchlight 4-H Afterschool Program maintains popularity

Program starts 2019-2020 year with 100 students enrolled

Kane Wickham, with the

4H youth with rocketsExtension's Will Douglas (left) prepares to help 4-H students in Searchlight launch rockets as part of the Laughlin-Searchlight 4-H Afterschool Program. Photo by Kelli Carlson.

The Laughlin-Searchlight 4-H Afterschool Program activities for 2019-2020 have begun and they are big this year. 

Will Douglas of Extension in Laughlin addressed the program at the recent Laughlin Town Advisory Board meeting. He said that the program is fun and exciting and provides extraordinary learning opportunities in the hours after school. 

The 4-H Afterschool Program, along with the other programs within Extension's Nevada 4-H Youth Development Program, offers innovative “learn-by-doing” activities to develop and enhance lifelong skills such as leadership, critical thinking, collaboration, decision-making and civic responsibility. 4-H offers a variety of project areas to participate in and learn from, as well as a multitude of new opportunities to explore and develop personal awareness.

4-H Afterschool develops programs to fit the demographics of local communities and counties. The organization offers support to other youth-serving programs in various formats, depending on the needs and interests of the youth and adults involved.

Pershing County Related News Articles, Fact Sheets, Reports...

 
2008 - 2009 PERSHING COUNTY AGRICULTURAL STATISTICS
This fact sheet is a summary of agricultural data from 2008-2009 for Pershing County, Nevada. The information and statistics in this fact sheet were gathered from the 2008-2009 Nevada Agricultural Statistics Service’s Annual Report and the 2007 USDA Census of Agriculture.
Foster, S. 2010, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
ALFALFA FOR BEEF COWS
Optimizing a ranch’s feed resources often requires strategic supplementation of standing forage with a processed protein, energy or mineral product. However, protein and energy supplements do not necessarily have to come out of a sack.
Foster, S. McCuin, G., Nelson, D., Schultz, B., and Torell, R. 2009, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Corn Variety Trial 2012, Pershing County
Alfalfa hay remains by far the most important crop, in terms of both acres harvested and value of production (Foster 2010). Small grains typically are grown for hay and are a rotational crop during the year(s) after an alfalfa field has been removed and when it is replanted.
Foster, S., and Davison, J. 2012, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Enterprise Budget, Conventional Alfalfa Hay Pershing County, Nevada, 2012
The enterprise budget estimates the typical costs of establishing alfalfa hay in Pershing County, Nev., (specifically in the Lovelock Valley area). It should be used as a guide to estimate costs and returns for conventional alfalfa hay (non Roundup-Ready) establishment and production.
Foster, S. 2012, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Enterprise Budget, Corn Production Pershing County, Nevada
An enterprise budget provides the best means to evaluate the potential profitability for a given enterprise or farm income source. Developing an enterprise budget allows an operator to identify typical costs, both variable and fixed, and probable returns associated with the production and marketing of a product.
Foster, S. 2013, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Enterprise Budget, Hoop Barn Swine Wean-to-Finish Production, Nevada, 2012
The goal of our Beginning Farmer and Rancher program is to help beginning agricultural producers succeed by providing them the opportunity to utilize the latest financial management tools, develop entrepreneurial skills, receive on-the-ground training in production agriculture, and get assistance in marketing.
Foster, S. 2012, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, FS-13-45
Enterprise Budget, Roundup®Ready Alfalfa Hay Pershing County, Nevada, 2012
Pershing County has approximately 36,900 acres of alfalfa production, with an approximate value of $37 million. (Foster, 2010) It should be used as a guide to estimate costs and returns for RR alfalfa hay establishment and production.
Foster, S. 2012, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Livestock Producer Interest in Local Processing
A mail survey of agricultural producers was conducted during autumn 2005 to assess producer interest in a potential livestock slaughter and/or processing facility in Northern Nevada. One hundred fifty-three surveys were returned, representing nearly 70 percent of total livestock producers in Northern Nevada.
Cowee, M., Curtis, K., Lewis, S., Harris, T. 2008, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Needs Assessment for Noxious Weeds in Pershing County: Part 1 of 5 – Problem Weeds and Approaches and Methods of Control
Located in northwestern Nevada, Pershing County has 135 farms and ranches covering more than 244,249 acres, excluding public lands in BLM-administered grazing allotments. The average farm size is 1,809 acres (2008 USDA Agricultural Census).
Foster, S., Schultz, B., and Singletary, L. 2011, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Nevada Open Range Law
This fact sheet provides an overview of the Nevada Open Range Law and its evolution in the U.S. and Nevada. Also, this law is the subject of increasing conflict between open range public land grazers and non-agricultural residents in or adjacent to public lands.
McCuin, G. and Foster, S. 2010, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Nutritional Properties of Windrowed and Standing Basin Wildrye over Time
Many Nevada farmers and ranchers are in constant search of economical, high- producing winter forages for their beef cattle production system. An often overlooked forage but one that is common in Nevada and the Intermountain West is basin wildrye (Leymus cinereus).
Foster, S. and Perryman, B. 2012, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Pershing County Annual Report Foster, S. 2017, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Russian Knapweed Control Trial 2013-2015, Pershing County
A document of effective ways to maintain and control Russian Knapweed crops.
Foster, S., and Schultz, B. 2016, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, PS-16-04
Soil Properties, Part 1 of 3: Physical Characteristics
A brief overview of the physical, biological and chemical characteristics of soils. The information is provided for agronomic producers to help them understand soil properties and characteristics.
Foster, S., Schultz, B., McCuin, G., Neibling, H., and Shewmaker, G. 2013, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Soil Properties, Part 2 of 3: Biological Characteristics
Since the introduction of synthetic fertilizers during the industrial revolution, most of the research has been focused on maintaining the nutrient balance in the soil. However, more researchers and agricultural producers are realizing that not only are the nutrients in the soil important, but also, biological health.
Foster, S., McCuin, G., Schultz, B., Neibling, H., and Shewmaker, G. 2012, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Viewpoint: An alternative Management Paradigm for Plant Communities Affected by Invasive Annual Grasses in the Intermountain West.
Today’s landscapes are not those described in 1860. With over 400,000 km2 colonized by cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) and other annual grasses, we believe it is time to declare: The pristine-management-paradigm has failed. Continued, wholesale application of this concept is misguided.
Perryman, B. L., Schultz, B. W., Mcadoo, J. K., Alverts, B., Cervantes, J. C., Foster, S., McCuin, G., Swanson, S. R. 2018, Rangelands, 40(3)

County Reports

 
Pershing County Annual Report Foster, S. 2017, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension

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