Featured Programs

Nevada Radon Education Program personnel, Susan Howe and Nadia Noel

Nevada Radon Education Program

The Nevada Radon Education Program is a partnership with the Nevada Division of Public and Behavioral Health to educate Nevadans about the health risk posed by elevated levels of radon in the home. The Extension program offers literature, educational presentations and low cost radon test kits in many county Extension and partner offices.

man applying pesticide

Integrated Pest Management

Integrated Pest Management program is a long-term management strategy that uses a combination of tactics to reduce pests to tolerable levels with potentially lower costs for the pest manager and minimal effect on the environment.

learning about riparians

Nevada Youth Range Camp Program

Most of Nevada’s youth live in large urban environments, with little exposure to rangelands, forests or agricultural environments, and the products and services rangelands provide. This program teaches students ages 14-18 how to read maps; identify and the importance of rangeland plants; evaluate sagebrush, woodland and stream ecosystems; wildlife habitat; and many other topics related to rangelands.

 

Excerpts from our latest newsletter

Nevada 4-H youth and families provide over 2,000 face masks for their communities

Extension called upon by those helping to manage the COVID-19 crisis

Claudene Wharton

 

When the Elko County Emergency Operations Center put in a call to their local University of Nevada, Reno Extension office saying they needed face masks, Extension’s 4-H youth and their families swung into action, making masks not only for the Operations Center, but also for their local School District nutrition services workers who are helping to serve lunches to students who receive free and reduced meals. Similarly, 4-H youth and their families in White Pine County were early responders to the need for masks, and have now made hundreds of masks for the William Bee Ririe Hospital and Rural Health Clinic in Ely.

Once the word got out that 4-Hers were helping to make masks, more requests started coming in.

“I’d say that requests are coming in faster than our 4-H members can sew,” said Jill Baker-Tingey, Extension educator in Elko County.

After these early efforts in Elko and Ely, Nevada 4-H launched a statewide service project to help provide face masks for all Nevada communities. Now, more than 2,000 masks have been provided by 4-H across Nevada, spanning 10 counties, from Reno to Las Vegas, and from Carson City to Elko. The face masks have been donated to hospitals, hospices, health clinics, tribal healthcare, senior centers, emergency operations centers, school districts, state parole offices, and other collaborative mask-making projects.

In addition, over 100 other PPE-related items have been provided by the 4-H service project, including scrub hats, surgical gowns and ear bands/savers, which prevent ear strain and irritation for those wearing masks for extended periods.

Carrie Stark, Nevada 4-H program director with Extension, said, "The whole 4-H community has pitched in – our 4-H youth and their families, as well as 4-H alumni and volunteers."

Catch a falling star ... literally

How to collect micrometeorites in your own backyard in August

Don Deever

Timelapse of the Perseid Meteor Shower over the Black Rock DesertCatch a falling star this August using only a basin of water, a plastic cup, a magnet and a paper plate. Photo by Trevor Bexon.

Every year, there are nine meteor showers that are rated as "Class 1" events. These showers are the are most exciting to see and produce particles that fall from the sky that anyone can catch. The Perseid meteor shower is generally considered to be the finest meteor shower of the year. It is renowned for displaying up to 100 "shooting stars" per hour.

This year, the shower is predicted to peak Aug. 11-13, so mark your calendars now and gather a few simple supplies to prepare to "catch a falling star." It's a simple, yet exciting, science project a child of any age can enjoy. Gazing upon these extraterrestrial visitors brings lasting memories and connects Earth-bound mortals to the wonders of infinite space from our own backyards.

There’s still a whole Universe out there— reach for the stars

"I’ll be sharing this project with our 4-H youth here in Nevada, for whom Extension is continuing to provide at-home and online STEM programs, amid the COVID-19 pandemic. But, it’s an interesting and uplifting activity we can all enjoy." -Assistant Professor & Extension Educator Don Deever

University offers agricultural crop research tours at Field Day in Fallon

Research being done on drought-tolerant and salt-tolerant crops

Claudene Wharton

chickpea plantChickpeas are one of the crops being researched by Extension at the Experiment Station Fallon Research Center.
Photo by Maninder K. Walia.

Agriculture producers and others are invited to get a first-hand look at crop trials and research being conducted in northern Nevada by the University's College of Agriculture, Biotechnology & Natural Resources. Field Day in Fallon is free and open to the public, and will take place 9:30-10:30 a.m., Aug. 12, at the College Experiment Station’s Fallon Research Center, 2053 Schurz Highway, as well as at two local farms.

"With a limited water supply, we are always looking for drought-tolerant crops for long-term sustainability," said Maninder K. Walia, assistant professor and field crop specialist with the College's Extension unit. "We are also looking at crops in high demand that our producers are interested in growing."

The Field Day will include walking tours and discussions of crops being researched at the Experiment Station and at two local farms. The crops currently being researched at the Experiment Station include chickpeas, dry beans, and ag and forage soybeans. Walia will discuss plant traits of these crops, including early maturity, forage nutrient content, biomass production and drought tolerance.

"There has been a good deal of interest in growing hemp from local producers, so we wanted to do some crop trials based on our growing conditions here in northern Nevada," she said.

This spring, Walia also began a three-year butternut squash crop trial at Rick Lattin’s Lattin Farms. There were four varieties planted in mid-May. The varieties are being evaluated in terms of quality, taste, consumer demand, ability to grow in Nevada’s climate and overall yield.

"There is a high demand from casinos in particular for butternut squash," Walia said. "They use it for soup and other recipes."

At the Field Day, Walia will also discuss opportunities to partner with the University to develop new cropping systems adapted to northern Nevada.

Fallon Field Day on, Nevada Field Day off

Due to continued uncertainty surrounding the novel coronavirus, we have made the difficult decision to cancel the 2020 Nevada Field Day. Held each fall in Reno, this event showcases the teaching, research and outreach of our College and its Experiment Station and Extension units. We will miss this opportunity to inform and interact with the members of our community, but feel this is the best decision to protect the health and safety of Nevadans. Please visit the coronavirus information page for ongoing updates from the University of Nevada, Reno.

If you would like to keep up to date on the happenings of our College, please subscribe to our newsletter.

Thank you for your continued interest in our College and its work, and we look forward to seeing you at Nevada Field Day in 2021.

Sincerely,

Bill Payne,
Dean of the College

Expanding knowledge for Nevada

"Extension is working to bring University and Experiment Station research to our communities to enhance people’s lives. One portion of my job is to determine needs or issues related to crops and resource use within our state and work to address those needs. I invite your input on these needs." -Assistant Professor & Extension Specialist Maninder Walia

Assistant professor conducts research on water management for Nevada climate

Manuel Alejandro Andrade-Rodriguez joins College of Agriculture, Biotechnology & Natural Resources

Hannah Alfaro

Manuel Alejandro Andrade RodriguezManuel Alejandro Andrade-Rodriguez is working to help farmers more efficiently irrigate crops in Nevada’s harsh climates. Photo by Robert Moore, Extension.

University of Nevada, Reno’s College of Agriculture, Biotechnology & Natural Resources welcomes new Assistant Professor Manuel Alejandro Andrade-Rodriguez to the Department of Agriculture, Veterinary & Rangeland Sciences and the Environmental Sciences Interdisciplinary Graduate Program.

Andrade-Rodriguez is investigating how to improve irrigation management in Nevada’s arid and semi-arid climates. With the state’s harsh weather and low precipitation, conservation and proper use of water is essential for successful crops. As part of the College’s Experiment Station, he is working to develop methods to help farmers know when to water their crops and how much water they need. Andrade-Rodriguez is also focusing on using different types of sensing systems, such as weather-, soil- and plant-sensing systems, and artificial intelligence to develop technologies that will help farmers know the most efficient way to irrigate crops.

His research will save water and improve how we irrigate crops

"Working at the University so far has been great, and my colleagues have been supportive of my research. We’ve been able to collaborate on different projects, and I’m excited to get back to my office and to the field." -Assistant Professor Manuel Alejandro Andrade-Rodriguez

Pershing County Related News Articles, Fact Sheets, Reports...

 
A summative evaluation of the Nevada Youth Range Camp educational program. Foster, S.S., Schultz, B.W., McAdoo, J.K., and Swanson, S. 2014, Journal National Association of County Agricultural Agents. 7:1.
Alfalfa for Beef Cows
Optimizing a ranch’s feed resources often requires strategic supplementation of standing forage with a processed protein, energy or mineral product. However, protein and energy supplements do not necessarily have to come out of a sack.
Foster, S. McCuin, G., Nelson, D., Schultz, B., and Torell, R. 2009, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Corn Variety Trial 2012, Pershing County
Alfalfa hay remains by far the most important crop, in terms of both acres harvested and value of production (Foster 2010). Small grains typically are grown for hay and are a rotational crop during the year(s) after an alfalfa field has been removed and when it is replanted.
Foster, S., and Davison, J. 2012, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Enterprise Budget, Conventional Alfalfa Hay Pershing County, Nevada
The enterprise budget estimates the typical costs of establishing alfalfa hay in Pershing County, Nev., (specifically in the Lovelock Valley area). It should be used as a guide to estimate costs and returns for conventional alfalfa hay (non Roundup-Ready) establishment and production.
Foster, S. 2012, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Enterprise Budget, Corn Production Pershing County, Nevada
An enterprise budget provides the best means to evaluate the potential profitability for a given enterprise or farm income source. Developing an enterprise budget allows an operator to identify typical costs, both variable and fixed, and probable returns associated with the production and marketing of a product.
Foster, S. 2013, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Enterprise Budget, Hoop Barn Swine Wean-to-Finish Production, Nevada, 2012
The goal of our Beginning Farmer and Rancher program is to help beginning agricultural producers succeed by providing them the opportunity to utilize the latest financial management tools, develop entrepreneurial skills, receive on-the-ground training in production agriculture, and get assistance in marketing.
Foster, S. 2012, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, FS-13-45
Enterprise Budget, Roundup Ready Alfalfa Hay Pershing County, Nevada
Pershing County has approximately 36,900 acres of alfalfa production, with an approximate value of $37 million. (Foster, 2010) It should be used as a guide to estimate costs and returns for RR alfalfa hay establishment and production.
Foster, S. 2012, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Extension Awards of Excellence Extension 2020, Extension
Livestock Producer Interest in Local Processing
A mail survey of agricultural producers was conducted during autumn 2005 to assess producer interest in a potential livestock slaughter and/or processing facility in Northern Nevada. One hundred fifty-three surveys were returned, representing nearly 70 percent of total livestock producers in Northern Nevada.
Cowee, M., Curtis, K., Lewis, S., Harris, T. 2008, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Needs Assessment for Noxious Weeds in Pershing County: Part 1 of 5 – Problem Weeds and Approaches and Methods of Control
Located in northwestern Nevada, Pershing County has 135 farms and ranches covering more than 244,249 acres, excluding public lands in BLM-administered grazing allotments. The average farm size is 1,809 acres (2008 USDA Agricultural Census).
Foster, S., Schultz, B., and Singletary, L. 2011, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Nevada (USA) range management school - Adapting an American grazing management curriculum to other continents. Schultz, B., McAdoo, K., Perryman, B., Foster, S., and Davison, J. 2015, Journal for Arid Lands Studies. 25-3: 273-276.
Nevada Open Range Law
This fact sheet provides an overview of the Nevada Open Range Law and its evolution in the U.S. and Nevada. Also, this law is the subject of increasing conflict between open range public land grazers and non-agricultural residents in or adjacent to public lands.
McCuin, G. and Foster, S. 2010, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Nevada Youth Range Camp (History)
Nevada Youth Range Camp focuses on relationships between people and rangeland. Campers learn that land managers need information about plants, wildlife, water and soil to make good decisions about rangeland management and use. The camp challenges youth to explore resource problems and create logical solutions.
Foster, S., McCuin, G., and Schultz, B. 2009, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, IP-09-05
Nevada Youth Range Camp plant identification guide. Foster, S., Schultz, B., and Swanson, S. 2018, UNCE Special Publication. SP-18-04.
Nutritional Properties of Windrowed and Standing Basin Wildrye over Time
Many Nevada farmers and ranchers are in constant search of economical, high- producing winter forages for their beef cattle production system. An often overlooked forage but one that is common in Nevada and the Intermountain West is basin wildrye (Leymus cinereus).
Foster, S. and Perryman, B. 2012, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Pershing County Agricultural Statistics (2008-2009)
This fact sheet is a summary of agricultural data from 2008-2009 for Pershing County, Nevada. The information and statistics in this fact sheet were gathered from the 2008-2009 Nevada Agricultural Statistics Service’s Annual Report and the 2007 USDA Census of Agriculture.
Foster, S. 2009, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Reducing cheatgrass fuel loads using fall cattle grazing. Foster, S., Schmelzer, L., Wilker, J., Schultz, B., McAdoo, K., Swanson, S., and Perryman, B. 2015, UNCE Special. SP-15-03. P.11.
Russian Knapweed Control Trial 2013-2015, Pershing County
A document of effective ways to maintain and control Russian Knapweed crops.
Foster, S., and Schultz, B. 2016, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, PS-16-04
Soil Properties, Part 1 of 3: Physical Characteristics
A brief overview of the physical, biological and chemical characteristics of soils. The information is provided for agronomic producers to help them understand soil properties and characteristics.
Foster, S., Schultz, B., McCuin, G., Neibling, H., and Shewmaker, G. 2013, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Soil Properties, Part 2 of 3: Biological Characteristics
Since the introduction of synthetic fertilizers during the industrial revolution, most of the research has been focused on maintaining the nutrient balance in the soil. However, more researchers and agricultural producers are realizing that not only are the nutrients in the soil important, but also, biological health.
Foster, S., McCuin, G., Schultz, B., Neibling, H., and Shewmaker, G. 2012, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Soil Properties, Part 3 of 3: Chemical Characteristics
Soil chemistry is the interaction of various chemical constituents that takes place among soil particles and in the soil solution, or the water retained by soil. The chemical interactions that occur in soil are highly complex, but understanding certain basic concepts will better help you manage your soils.
Foster, S., Urbanowitz, S., Gatzke, H., and Schultz, B. 2016, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, Fact Sheet FS-16-02
Viewpoint: An alternative Management Paradigm for Plant Communities Affected by Invasive Annual Grasses in the Intermountain West.
Today’s landscapes are not those described in 1860. With over 400,000 km2 colonized by cheatgrass (Bromus tectorum) and other annual grasses, we believe it is time to declare: The pristine-management-paradigm has failed. Continued, wholesale application of this concept is misguided.
Perryman, B. L., Schultz, B. W., Mcadoo, J. K., Alverts, B., Cervantes, J. C., Foster, S., McCuin, G., Swanson, S. R. 2018, Rangelands. 40:77-82.

County Reports

 
Pershing County Annual Report | Fiscal Year 2017 - 2018
Pershing County Annual Report | July 1, 2017 - June 30, 2018
Foster, S. 2017, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno

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