Featured Programs

Nevada Radon Education Program personnel, Susan Howe and Nadia Noel

Nevada Radon Education Program

The Nevada Radon Education Program is a partnership with the Nevada Division of Public and Behavioral Health to educate Nevadans about the health risk posed by elevated levels of radon in the home. The Extension program offers literature, educational presentations and low cost radon test kits in many county Extension and partner offices.

hands holding freshly picked carrots

Grow Your Own, Nevada!

Learn the secrets of high desert gardening

Excerpts from our latest newsletter

4-H National Youth Science Day is a 'Game Changer'

Students learn computer science concepts through creating games

By Karen Best and Carrie Stark

girl coding a cat using the Scratch program languageA student codes a public service announcement using the Scratch programming language as part of 4-H National Youth Science Day 2019. Photo by Karen Best.

On Oct. 18, 122 fourth-grade students and future 4-H members at Judith D. Steele Elementary School in Las Vegas took part in 4-H National Youth Science Day. This year’s challenge, Game Changers, took the students through three sessions devoted to computer science. First, students learned what a public service announcement was before creating their own using Scratch, a programming language that is easy for youth to use. Second, students designed their own game board, Hack Your Harvest, to learn the basics of computer coding. Lastly, students created an active tag game, Program Your Playground, by using the concepts or conditionals, pattern recognition, etc. Students ended their sessions with smiles and some 4-H buttons, pencils and stickers. Many students called the day “the best day ever” and look forward to the upcoming year, during which they will be working on a coding and robotics project.

The 2019 National Youth Science Day challenge was designed by Google and West Virginia University Extension Service to teach youth ages 8-14 how to use computer science to create games, solve problems and engage with topics they’re passionate about. This year’s experiment used physical activity and puzzles to teach kids important computer science concepts and problem-solving skills, creating real-world connections between computer science and civic engagement, healthy living and agriculture.

Connecting computer science, civic engagement, healthy living and agriculture

This year’s experiment uses physical activity and puzzles to teach kids important computer science concepts and problem-solving skills.

 

Photo Gallery | Nevada Field Day 2019

University experts showcase research, activities and programs at fall festival

Photos by Robert Moore

At Nevada Field Day on Oct. 19, visitors were treated to a variety of free activities and giveaways, and even some tasty food samples, courtesy of the University of Nevada, Reno and its College of Agriculture, Biotechnology & Natural Resources.

The event featured hands-on activities and information focusing on the latest advancements in agriculture, horticulture, nutrition, natural resources and the environment. It is a collaborative project of the College of Agriculture, Biotechnology & Natural Resources; and its research and outreach units, the Experiment Station and Extension.

Animal science students working with kids

Students in the College's Animal Science Program share an activity with children.

Students from the plant genomics lab

Students in the College's Plant Genomics Lab present the research they are doing on mustard.

Nevada Radon Education leader showing visitors a radon brochure

Extension's Nevada Radon Education Program Coordinator Nadia Noel shows visitors an informational brochure about the dangers of radon.

Chef Clint Jolly

Chef Clint Jolly performs a cooking demonstration with produce from the University’s Desert Farming Initiative and meat from the University’s Wolf Pack Meats.

Desert Farming Initiative Booth

The Desert Farming Initiative sells its local produce and gives out some free samples.

girl throwing beanbags at house-shaped target

A girl throws beanbag "embers" at targets representing highly flammable house parts aat the Ember House game, presented by Extension's Living With Fire Program.

Bees4Vets volunteer presenting honeycomb to visitors

A Bees4Vets presenter shows honeycomb to visitors while explaining the research being done at the Experiment Station about the therapeutic benefits of beekeeping.

Jugs of juice from grapes grown by the University

A presenter shows the results from research with grapevines.

students with cactus products

Students present products that can be made using prickly pear cactuses, an alternative crop being researched by the College.

Child getting a 4-H sticker

A child gets a sticker from Extension's Nevada 4-H Youth Development Program.

This year’s Field Day featured over 45 booths and activities

For over 60 years, University students and faculty have used the Main Station Field Lab to provide education and research, not only on raising and processing healthy cattle, but also on a variety of other important issues, including controlling noxious weeds, developing alternative low-water-use crops, and preserving air and water quality.

News Articles, Fact Sheets, Reports...

 
Early Detection and Rapid Response (EDRR) Education and Implementation Results in Nevada
Traditionally, new weed invasions are not detected or addressed until they are so dense and widespread that eradication is not feasible. Early Detection and Rapid Response (EDRR) is an approach to weed control that emphasizes controlling new, invading weeds while the populations are localized and small.
Newton, J., Davison, J., Schultz, B., Blecker, L., and Creech, E. 2013, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Integrated Weed Management in and around Established Alfalfa Fields
Many weeds are less palatable or nutritious for livestock than alfalfa, or are toxic. Weeds establish in alfalfa when the alfalfa is both growing and dormant. This fact sheet is intended to facilitate management decisions that reduce economic losses in established alfalfa due to weed pests.
Blecker, L., Davison, J., Schultz, B., and Newton, J. 2012, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Know Nevada Insects: Orange sulphur butterfly - Colias eurytheme (Boisduval)
The collective research on the description and life cycle of orange sulphur butterfly. Including the damages done by caterpillars and integrated pest management as a result of it.
Burls, K. and Newton, J. 2017, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, Fact Sheet 17-15
Non-Chemical Weed Control for Small Acreage Farmers in Nevada
Many small acreage farming operations are organic-based or strongly prefer weed management recommendations that preclude the use of conventional herbicides. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide basic information and resources on non-chemical weed control options for these small acreage farmers.
Davison, J. and Newton, J. 2012, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Varroa Mite Integrated Pest Management for Small-Scale Beekeepers in Nevada
Interesting facts about Varroa Mite and there Life Cycle, ways to start an IPM treatment program for them, control methods, and pesticides available for use in Nevada.
Newton, J. 2016, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension

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