Featured Programs

hands holding freshly picked carrots

Grow Your Own, Nevada!

Learn the secrets of high desert gardening

Nevada Radon Education Program personnel, Susan Howe and Nadia Noel

Nevada Radon Education Program

The Nevada Radon Education Program is a partnership with the Nevada Division of Public and Behavioral Health to educate Nevadans about the health risk posed by elevated levels of radon in the home. The Extension program offers literature, educational presentations and low cost radon test kits in many county Extension and partner offices.

Master Gardeners at tabling event

Master Gardeners of Nevada

Program trains local gardeners to provide research-based horticulture information to Nevadans

Excerpts from our latest newsletter

Extension introduces economic development initiative across Nevada

Collaborative University project aims to improve county data for planning efforts

Tiffany Kozsan

Tom Harris presents on economic developmentTom Harris, with Extension and the University Center for Economic Development, presents on economic development. He and Buddy Borden, also with Extension, are leading an effort to collect data to help strengthen communities throughout Nevada. Photo by David Pritchett, Nevada Bureau of Land Management.

A collaborative statewide initiative, led by Extension, is underway to provide counties with timely economic data and analytical tools to improve county-level planning and policy assessment efforts.

The Nevada Economic Assessment Project (also known as “NEAP”) aims to provide county, state and federal agencies, and their partners, with quantitative and qualitative baseline data and analyses to better understand trends in each county’s demographic, social, economic, fiscal and environmental characteristics.

The project is led by Buddy Borden and Tom Harris, who are both community economic development specialists with Extension. Harris is also director of the University Center for Economic Development.

The project is currently active in Elko, Esmeralda, Humboldt, Lincoln and Nye Counties, and will be launched in the other Nevada counties over the next 18 months. Each county process takes about five months and includes data collection and analysis, economic impact model development, asset mapping and county workshops, all based on local input.

The project’s contributing members include the University’s College of Agriculture, Biotechnology & Natural Resources; the College's Experiment Station; University Center for Economic Development;  Nevada Bureau of Land Management; U.S. Forest Service; U.S. Department of Agriculture, Rural Development; and the Nevada Association of Counties.

Locating reliable quantitative socioeconomic data has long been a challenge for many Nevada rural counties

“The overall goal of the Nevada Economic Assessment Project is to develop and maintain a comprehensive database and set of county analytical tools that are useful for Nevadans working on a variety of issues relating to economic development, community planning and impact assessments.” -Buddy Borden

 

Cattlemen’s Update provides market, production and research updates for 2020

Educational programs held at seven locations across Nevada

Hannah Alfaro

Mozart Fonseca speaking to cattlemen from a lecturnMozart Fonseca, an associate professor in the Department of Agriculture, Veterinary & Rangeland Sciences, discussed the effects of cattle nutrition on epigenetics. Photo by Robert Moore.

University of Nevada, Reno held the annual Cattlemen’s Update across Nevada Jan. 6-10, 2020, focusing on cattle markets, cattle grazing, and upcoming and ongoing research projects that impact the Nevada beef industry. The event provided current research-based information about important management practices and issues that may affect the efficiency, productivity, profitability and sustainability of the state’s cattle production businesses.

The five-day event with seven locations across the state was a partnership led by the College of Agriculture, Biotechnology & Natural Resources, and its Experiment Station units. Other program partners included local sponsors and U.S. Department of Agriculture’s Risk Management Agency. Each day, the three- to four-hour program was held at a different location, where experts discussed pertinent topics with participants.

Nevada Rancher Magazine published an article about the event summarizing its key takeaways.

Lyon County Related News Articles, Fact Sheets, Reports...

 
Early Detection and Rapid Response (EDRR) Education and Implementation Results in Nevada
Traditionally, new weed invasions are not detected or addressed until they are so dense and widespread that eradication is not feasible. Early Detection and Rapid Response (EDRR) is an approach to weed control that emphasizes controlling new, invading weeds while the populations are localized and small.
Newton, J., Davison, J., Schultz, B., Blecker, L., and Creech, E. 2013, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Integrated Weed Management in and around Established Alfalfa Fields
Many weeds are less palatable or nutritious for livestock than alfalfa, or are toxic. Weeds establish in alfalfa when the alfalfa is both growing and dormant. This fact sheet is intended to facilitate management decisions that reduce economic losses in established alfalfa due to weed pests.
Blecker, L., Davison, J., Schultz, B., and Newton, J. 2012, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Kids Know Nevada Insects: Monarch Butterfly
I am the monarch butterfly! I am found all throughout the United States and even southern Canada. I am most well-known for the yearly trip back and forth (called a migration) that I make every fall and spring. Monarchs in Nevada and other western states head to the coast of California, but those in the east head all th
Burls, K., Newton, J. 2015, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, IP
Know Nevada Insects: Monarch Butterfly
The monarch butterfly is perhaps one of the most iconic butterfly species in North America, and it can be found throughout Nevada in the summertime. Learn about Monarch lifecycle, catepillar host plants and damage, threats and conservation and resources.
Burls, K., Newton, J. 2015, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, IP
Know Nevada Insects: Orange Sulphur Butterfly
I am the orange sulphur butterfly! I can be found in all of the United States, except Alaska and Hawaii. I fly most of the summer, from May to October, in Nevada. Learn about my life cycle, why I'm important and what I eat.
Burls, K., Newton, J. 2015, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, IP
Know Nevada Insects: Orange sulphur butterfly - Colias eurytheme (Boisduval)
The collective research on the description and life cycle of orange sulphur butterfly. Including the damages done by caterpillars and integrated pest management as a result of it.
Burls, K. and Newton, J. 2017, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension, Fact Sheet 17-15
Non-Chemical Weed Control for Small Acreage Farmers in Nevada
Many small acreage farming operations are organic-based or strongly prefer weed management recommendations that preclude the use of conventional herbicides. The purpose of this fact sheet is to provide basic information and resources on non-chemical weed control options for these small acreage farmers.
Davison, J. and Newton, J. 2012, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Varroa Mite Integrated Pest Management for Small-Scale Beekeepers in Nevada
Interesting facts about Varroa Mite and there Life Cycle, ways to start an IPM treatment program for them, control methods, and pesticides available for use in Nevada.
Newton, J. 2016, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension

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