Featured Programs

Nevada Radon Education Program personnel, Susan Howe and Nadia Noel

Nevada Radon Education Program

The Nevada Radon Education Program is a partnership with the Nevada Division of Public and Behavioral Health to educate Nevadans about the health risk posed by elevated levels of radon in the home. The Extension program offers literature, educational presentations and low cost radon test kits in many county Extension and partner offices.

hands holding freshly picked carrots

Grow Your Own, Nevada!

Learn the secrets of high desert gardening

Master Gardeners at tabling event

Master Gardeners of Nevada

Program trains local gardeners to provide research-based horticulture information to Nevadans

 

Excerpts for our latest newsletter

Fernley STEM Festival highlights local career opportunities

College joins representatives from other colleges, community colleges, trade schools and local businesses to show kids that STEM jobs are fun

Hiedi Andersen, Fernley Leader-Courier

girl with shocked expression holding a sublimated CO2 bubbleAllison Noury, 8, from Cottonwood Elementary, reacts to holding a sublimated CO2 bubble at Fernley High School's STEM Festival. Photo by Ed Andersen, Fernley Leader-Courier.

Hundreds of students participated in the Fernley STEM Festival at Fernley High School March 5. Started in 2013, the event highlights ways science, technology, engineering and math influence daily life. This year’s event also focused on STEM careers — particularly those in demand in northern Nevada, said event coordinator Marjorie Mauk.

“We want kids to know that jobs in STEM fields are fun,” said Mauk, a seventh-grade science teacher at Silverland Middle School. “We want (attendees) to know that STEM is not (just a) lab coat with a pocket protector. The jobs are fun; they’re really cool.”

Also on hand were representatives from the University, community colleges and trade schools.

“There are a lot of FFA students here that could consider an ag science major,” said Michaela Cano, an academic advisor for the College of Agriculture, Biotechnology & Natural Resources. "[The College] offers majors in agriculture science, biochemistry and molecular biology, biotechnology, forest management and ecohydrology, among others. Those types of programs prepare students for jobs in demand in northern Nevada, including water management, pollution prevention and wildlife preservation," she said.

"We want (attendees) to know that STEM is not (just a) lab coat with a pocket protector."

- Marjorie Mauk, event coordinator and seventh-grade science teacher at Silverland Middle School

 

Nevada 4-H response to COVID-19

Response and resources to use at club to prevent the spread of germs

Carrie Stark

hands getting washed in a sinkHand washing with soap is one of the best ways to prevent the spread of germs. 

Dealing with the constant change seems to be the new normal (or at least in the past two weeks). Tough decisions are being made on an hourly basis.  For the Nevada 4-H Youth Development Program, the decision was made to suspend all 4-H activities, including all 4-H club meetings, until further notice. The Extension administrative team continues to monitor the situation and will keep everyone updated as to the status of Nevada 4-H programming.

We understand this is a major disruption to the normal way traditional 4-H programs are delivered. However, we believe 4-H can still be an excellent way for Nevada youth to grow and learn during these unique and challenging times. The way we connect with each other may change but the mission of 4-H will not. We are strong and will continue to provide high quality positive youth development opportunities for the youth of Nevada.

The 4-H Club Guidance for COVID-19 Publication was put together by University of California 4-H and adapted for Nevada 4-H. While it was designed to help clubs with social distancing within their club meetings, there are practices that should be adopted even after this pandemic is over to help stop the spread of germs.

Thank you to 4-H professionals, 4-H volunteer leaders and 4-H families for staying flexible, asking good questions, making recommendations, stating facts, being patient, and helping to keep our families and our communities safe and healthy.

4-H is a community of young people across America learning leadership, citizenship and life skills

Members learn life skills, make new friends, enhance self-esteem, achieve personal goals, develop positive relationships with peers and volunteers, and have fun learning and sharing as a family and a club

 

The time for this water-saving grain in Nevada is now

College Professor John Cushman discusses teff

Joe Schoenmann, KNPR

TeffTeff, which uses less water than conventional grains, can be grown as hay for livestock and as a gluten-free grain.

Nevada’s agricultural producers often contend with drought, and there is an increasing demand for water for uses other than crops.
 
Researchers with the University of Nevada, Reno, have been working to evaluate and commercialize crops that use less water.
 
Professor John Cushman and his team think they’ve found an alternative. It's called teff.
 
The grain can be grown as hay for livestock and as a gluten-free grain. Cushman says Nevada's scarce water supplies mean now would be a good time for northern Nevada farmers to start using the grain for livestock and to grow sprouts for salad bars.

Drought and nonagricultural water demands leave agriculture producers in a tight spot

Teff requires less water than alfalfa and can be more profitable

Douglas County Related News Articles, Fact Sheets, Reports...

 
A bundle of golden Crested Wheatgrass in a dry field.
A Homeowner's Guide to Planting Crested Wheatgrass
The following description for planting crested wheatgrass applies to homeowners seeding relatively small areas (less than two acres) and who do not have access to specialized rangeland seeding equipment. For larger planting efforts, contact your local University of Nevada Cooperative Extension office for suggestions.
Smith, E., Davison, J., Carlos, B. 1999, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, FS-99-96
cheatgrass
A Homeowner’s Guide to Cheatgrass
Cheatgrass, also known as downy brome and bronco grass, is an annual plant native to Europe and Asia. Cheatgrass has a serious environmental impact on Nevada. It dries out very quickly, becoming extremely flammable. This increases the occurrence and intensity of fires in sagebrush areas.
Davison, J. and Smith, E. 2006, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Agriculture is a Good Fit in Floodplains
The floodplain plays a vital role in the safety of our community and downstream communities when large rain-on-snow floods occur, about every 15 or 20 years. Learn more about agricultural land use and communities mistakes involving floodplain in this factsheet.
Cobourn J. and Lewis S. 2011, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, FS-11-69
Consumer Preferences for Meat Attributes
Recent food industry trends have presented consumers with the opportunity to demand more from the products they purchase. In the market for food products, this means that consumers are able to purchase products that do more than serve their basic need for nutrition.
Cowee, M., Curtis, K., Harris, T., and Lewis, S. 2008, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Don’t Put Your Home and Family at Risk from Floods!
If you own or are considering buying property near the bank of a river or stream, beware of building a home there! If the property is mapped as “Zone A” Regulatory Floodplain, that means flooding is a very real possibility — at least 1 percent chance in any year. Learn more about the risk of floods in this factsheet.
Cobourn, J., Lewis, S., and Swanson, S. 2011, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, FS-11-70
Douglas County Cow-Calf Production Costs & Returns, 2006
This publication is intended to be a guide used to make production decisions, determine potential returns, and prepare business and marketing plans. Practices described are based on the production practices considered typical for a beef cattle cow-calf operation in this region, but may not apply to every operation.
Curtis, K., Lewis, S., and Ruby, K. 2006, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
An Ember House structure with ember vulnerabilities highlighted in orange. A trashcan adjacent to the Ember House.
Ember House 3.0 Building Instructions
This is information on how to build an Ember House. The Ember House serves as a youth activity to educate kids on the ember threat of wildfires on homes. There is no one “right way” to build an Ember House. There are a lot of variations out there. Reported below is simply how LWF created theirs.
Smith, E. 2020, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, IP-20
social media training
Facebook for Extension Professionals
Universities, colleges and Cooperative Extensions around the country use social media to reach constituents with instructional, research and outreach messages. When Extension professionals participate on social networks, members of the public have access to news and information from valued, trusted and credible sources. And, when Extension professionals engage with them, online networks provide interactive, genuine and far-reaching communities that keep Extension professionals current and connected to issues or concerns of the general public and present opportunities for collaboration and scientific inspiration. While these opportunities are found in various social networks, this publication focuses on Facebook. It includes information on platform selection and use, maintaining a professional and personal balance, social license, accessibility, responding to criticism with professionalism, and more.
Andrews, A. and Chichester, L. 2018, Extension
Financial Potential for Livestock Slaughter and Processing in Nevada
This publication presents a brief overview of the financial information generated from the study. This section of the study addresses financial analyses and recommendations for an optimal solution to slaughtering and processing animals.
Cowee, M., Curtis, K., Harris, T., and Lewis, S. 2008, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
house on fire
Fire Adapted Communities: The Next Step in Wildfire Preparedness
Do you know what it takes to survive a wildfire? A fire adapted communities is a community located in fire-prone area that requires little assistance from firefighters during a wildfire. Residents of these communities accept responsibility for living in a high fire hazard area.
Smith, E., Sistare, S., Nejedlo, G. 2011, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, SP-11-01
The Angora Fire burns hillsides across Lake Tahoe. Smoke plumes in the air.
Fire Adapted Communities: The Next Step in Wildfire Preparedness. Lake Tahoe Basin
There are proven steps that homeowners can take to improve personal safety and home survival during wildfire. The purpose of this publication is to present these steps and encourage neighbors to work together and with their local fire firefighting agency to take action.
Smith, E., Sistare, S. 2014, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, SP-14-05
Floodplain Protection Inventory for the Carson River
The floodplain of a river is the adjacent low-lying land that temporarily stores floodwater. This riverine floodplain is an integral part of a river. In most cases, the soil on floodplains was deposited by the river or creek over an extended period of time.
Cobourn, J. and Lewis, S. 2015, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, Fact Sheet FS-15-05
A house and car completely engulfed in flames
How can I prepare my home and neighborhood for a wildfire?
University experts caution actions taken by homeowners before a fire ever starts play a critical role.
Smith, E. and Andrews, A. 2019, Nevada Today
A wildfire burns brush near a cluster of homes with text: How to Complete a Community Wildfire Protection Plan for Nevada Communities
How to Complete a Community Wildfire Protection Plan for Nevada Communities
A Community Wildfire Protection Plan (CWPP) describes the wildfire hazards and mitigation measures for a community. Completing and implementing a CWPP is an important means for residents of Nevada’s wildfire prone areas to address the wildfire threat.
Smith, E., Sistare, S. 2013, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, SP-13-14
A cluster of homes in Washoe County adjacent to the urban interface with text: How to Complete a Community Wildfire Protection Plan for Washoe County Communities
How to Complete a Community Wildfire Protection Plan for Washoe County Communities
A Community Wildfire Protection Plan (CWPP) describes the wildfire hazards and mitigation measures for a community. Completing and implementing a CWPP is an important means for residents of Washoe County’s wildfire-prone areas to address the wildfire threat.
Smith, E., Sistare, S., Nejedlo, G. 2013, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, SP-13-06
Increasing Collaborative Success Between American Indians and Agriculture Professionals
It has been recognized that American Indian populations don’t take full advantage of federal programs aimed at enhancing agriculture and natural resource management practices. Emm and Singletary (2009) claim that some of the problem stems from these programs not being designed with the American Indian in mind.
Lewis, S. and Emm, R. 2011, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
A women rakes leaves on her front lawn. House in the background.
Ten Frequently Asked Questions About Defensible Space
As Nevada communities grow, so does the wildfire threat on homes. The term "defensible space" was coined to describe vegetation management practices aimed at reducing the wildfire threat to homes. This fact sheet addresses some of the frequently asked questions regarding defensible space.
Smith, E. 1996, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, FS-96-39
A pile of mulch burns in a controlled experiment
The Combustibility of Landscape Mulches
Mulch plays an important role in Western residential landscapes. Unfortunately many mulches are combustible, a major drawback when used in home landscapes located in wildfire-prone areas. Using the results from an evaluation of mulch combustibility, recommendations are offered concerning the use of mulches.
Quarles, S., Smith, E. 2011, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, SP-11-04
Men shoveling pine needles into a trailer
What is defensible space and how do I create some around my home?
University experts help homeowners to make homes more fire safe
Smith, E. and Andrews, A. 2019, Nevada Today
WIldfire Evacuation Checklist Information on How to prepare yourself for a quick and safe evacuation
Wildfire Evacuation Checklist
Information on how to prepare yourself, your home, and your family for a quick and safe wildfire evacuation. Be prepared! Please evacuate immediately when asked.
Smith, Ed 2006, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, FS-06-07
Cars driving at night while a wildfire approaches the road
Wildfire Evacuation Checklist (Spanish)
Si su propiedad está en peligro de incendio y usted debe evacuar tenga en consideración las siguientes medidas de seguridad.
Smith, E. 2020, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, IP-20
research
Women in science: a Q&A with CABNR pet food mercury researchers
Professor Gustin and fellow researchers Chichester, Dunham-Cheatam, Luippold and Vargas-Estrada talk about their work and answer related questions
Gustin, M.S., Chichester, L., Dunham-Cheatham, S., Luippold, A., and Vargas Estrada M. 2019, Nevada Today

County Reports

 
Carson City / Storey County County Annual Report | Fiscal Year 2017 - 2018
Carson City / Storey County County Annual Report | July 1, 2017 - June 30, 2018
Chichester, L. 2017, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno
Douglas County Annual Report | Fiscal Year 2017 - 2018
Douglas County Annual Report | July 1, 2017 - June 30, 2018
Chichester, L. 2017, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno

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