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This program page was supported by the Nevada Division of Public and Behavioral Health through Grant Number K1-96963520-0 from the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency. Its contents are solely the responsibility of the authors and do not represent the official views of the Nevada Division of Public and Behavioral Health nor the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency.

The 2020 Nevada Radon Poster Contest is underway

Drawing of a skeleton wearing a gas mask with the message, "Radon, Test your home now before it's too late!"The Nevada Radon Education Program Poster Contest is underway! Entry deadline is Oct. 31, 2019. This contest is designed to raise awareness for radon testing and inform people of the danger of radon in their homes. Nevada youth, ages 9-14 are eligible. They can be enrolled in a public, private, territorial, tribal, DoD or home school; or through a sponsoring club, such as an art, computer, reading or science clubs, scouting organizations, or 4-H clubs.

 

Poster topics are 1) What is radon? 2) Where does radon come from? 3) How does radon get into our homes? 4) Radon can cause lung cancer and 5) Test your home for radon.

 

For complete contest rules, download the Nevada Radon Poster Contest flyer, or call the Radon Hotline at 888-RADON10 (888-723-6610).

 

Ana Marquez's winning 2019 poster, Radon, Test Your Home Now!

 

 

Nevada Radon Education Program

The Nevada Radon Education Program is a partnership with the Nevada Division of Public and Behavioral Health to educate Nevadans about the health risk posed by elevated levels of radon in the home. The Extension program offers literature, educational presentations and low cost radon test kits in many county Extension and partner offices.

Radon is a naturally occurring radioactive gas that has no odor, color or taste and is produced by the breakdown of uranium in soil, rock and water. Uranium is found in all soils and in higher concentrations in granite, shale and phosphates. As it decays into radon gas, the radon moves through the soil into the atmosphere, where it is harmlessly dispersed in outdoor air or can enter buildings through the foundation and become trapped inside. When it enters a building, it can accumulate and present a health risk for occupants. Buildings other than homes can also have radon concerns (such as commercial buildings, schools, apartments, etc.).

Radon is classified as a Group A carcinogen, a substance known to cause cancer in humans. Next to smoking, scientists believe that radon is associated with more lung cancer deaths than any other carcinogen. More than 20,000 Americans die of radon-related lung cancer each year, making it the leading cause of lung cancer in nonsmokers. Not everyone exposed to radon will get lung cancer, but the greater the radon level and the longer the exposure, the greater the risk of developing lung cancer.

All homes should be tested for radon, and many more need to be tested.

 

How to Find Out If You Have a Radon Problem

Since you can't see, smell or taste radon, testing is the only way to find out if you have a radon problem. Homeowners can measure radon concentrations in their homes themselves using inexpensive and easy to use test kits, or professional, certified testers can test a home. Certified testers may charge $150 to $300 for the test, but results can be made available shortly after 48 hours. When testing for a real estate transaction, it is recommended a qualified (certified) tester be used.

Learn more about the program contributor(s)

Susan Howe
Program Leader & Contact
Nadia Noel
Program Leader & Contact
Jill Baker-Tingey
Program Contact
Catherine Bergey
Program Contact
Carol Bishop
Program Contact
Linda Brown
Program Contact
Juan Carlos Cervantes
Program Contact
Lindsay Chichester
Program Contact
Patricia Click
Program Contact
Michelle Davis
Program Contact
Holly Gatzke
Program Contact
Jacob Holloway
Program Contact
Candie Kevan
Program Contact
Shahara McGee
Program Contact
Dixie McKay
Program Contact
Marcia Moffitt
Program Contact
Lisa K. Taylor
Program Contact
Dianna Walker
Program Contact

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News Articles, Fact Sheets, Reports...
2018 Carson City Radon Potential Map
Us this map to find out the potential of radon exposure in Carson City homes.
Howe, S. 2018, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno. IP
2018 Churchill County Radon Potential Map
Use this map to find out the potential of radon exposure in Churchill County homes.
Howe, S. 2018, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno. IP
2018 Clark County Radon Potential Map
Use this map to find out the potential of radon exposure in Clark County homes.
Howe, S. 2018, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno. IP
2020 Nevada Radon Poster Contest Flyer
The 2020 Nevada Radon Education Program Poster Contest is underway!
Howe, S. 2019, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno
How Radon Gas Enters Homes
Radon can enter and collect inside almost any home or other building through dirt floors, hollow block walls, cracks in the foundation floor and walls, sump pumps, openings around floor drains, joints and foundation openings for pipes, sewers and other utility connections.
Howe, S. 2019, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno. IP
How to Get a Radon Test Kit
Instructions on how to purchase a Radon test kit in Nevada through the Nevada Radon Education Program.
Howe, S. 2019, Extension | University of Nevada. IP
Nevada Radon Test Kit Locations
Nevada Radon Education Program Radon Test Kit Locations
Howe, S. 2019, University of Nevada, Reno Extension