Mills, L., and Johnson, W. 1988, Common Tomato Disorders Under Desert Conditions, Extension, University of Nevada Reno, FS-88-60

Whether you call it a fruit or vegetable, the tomato is the most popular of all home-grown foods in the United States. Southern Nevada is no exception. A survey by the National Garden Association round 93 percent of the American gardeners surveyed grew tomatoes. The main reason for the popularity of this nutritious vegetable is its excellent flavor and yield. Unfortunately, there are more production problems growing tomatoes than growing many other garden vegetables.

Harsh climatic conditions, nutrient deficiencies, poor cultural practices and disease all bring on disorders that limit tomato production. Common problems include blossom drop, blossom end rot, curling leaves, sun scald, herbicide damage, cracking and poor overall growth. Gardeners can minimize these problems by using good cultural practices and common sense.

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Common Tomato Disorders Under Desert Conditions

Whether you call it a fruit or vegetable, the tomato is the most popular of all home-grown foods in the United States. Southern Nevada is no exception. A survey by the National Garden Association round 93 percent of the American gardeners surveyed grew tomatoes. The main reason for the popularity of this nutritious vegetable is its excellent flavor and yield. Unfortunately, there are more production problems growing tomatoes than growing many other garden vegetables.

Harsh climatic conditions, nutrient deficiencies, poor cultural practices and disease all bring on disorders that limit tomato production. Common problems include blossom drop, blossom end rot, curling leaves, sun scald, herbicide damage, cracking and poor overall growth. Gardeners can minimize these problems by using good cultural practices and common sense.

For the complete article use the link below.

Published by: Mills, L., and Johnson, W., 1988, Common Tomato Disorders Under Desert Conditions, Extension, University of Nevada Reno, FS-88-60