Green Fountain GrassWhen we hear that a plant is a weed, we often envision something unpleasant to see, touch or have nearby, such as a stinging nettle or some thistles. If that were true, weed control would be less challenging than it is – everyone would want to remove the pests!

The unfortunate fact is, a plant need not be ugly to pose a big problem. Some of our most environmentally destructive weeds were actually introduced as lovely landscape plants. Only after they have become overly successful, crowding out members of the native plant community, does their negative potential become clear.

One of those pest plants is green fountain grass, Pennisetum setaceum. It has thrived throughout the world wherever it has been introduced. In the Western United States, its drought tolerance gives it an advantage over less tolerant native or introduced plants.

For the complete description, how to control it and replacement plants, use the link below to download the PDF version.

O'Callaghan, A. M., and Robinson, ML 2014, Green Fountain Grass, Extension, University of Nevada Reno, FS-14-11

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Also of Interest:

 
A Change in the Ecological Understanding of Rangelands in the Great Basin and Intermountain West and Implications for Management: Revisiting Mack and Thompson (1982) Perryman, P., Schultz, B., Meiman, P. 2021, Rangeland Ecology & Management Vol 76, Pages 1-11
Photo of crimson fountaingrass plant
Nevada Noxious Weed Field Guide – Crimson fountaingrass
Crimson fountaingrass is a noxious weed that has been identified by the state of Nevada to be harmful to agriculture, the general public, or the environment. Learn more about this weed.
Blecker, L., Creech, E., Dick, J., Gephart, S., Hefner, M., Kratsch, H., Moe, A., Schultz, B. 2020, Extension, University of Nevada, Reno, Field Guide
Photo of johnsongrass adult plant with purple feathery flowers on top
Nevada Noxious Weed Field Guide – Johnsongrass
Johnsongrass is a noxious weed that has been identified by the state of Nevada to be harmful to agriculture, the general public, or the environment. Learn more about this weed.
Blecker, L., Creech, E., Dick, J., Gephart, S., Hefner, M., Kratsch, H., Moe, A., Schultz, B. 2020, Extension, University of Nevada, Reno, Field Guide
Photo of many green jointed goatgrass plants that look like a field
Nevada Noxious Weed Field Guide – Jointed goatgrass
Jointed goatgrass is a noxious weed that has been identified by the state of Nevada to be harmful to agriculture, the general public, or the environment. Learn more about this weed.
Blecker, L., Creech, E., Dick, J., Gephart, S., Hefner, M., Kratsch, H., Moe, A., Schultz, B. 2020, Extension, University of Nevada, Reno, Field Guide
Oxidative stability of beef from steers finished exclusively with concentrate, supplemented, or on legume-grass pasture Fruet, A.P.B., de Mello, A.S., Trombetta, F., Stefanello, F.S., Speroni, C.S., de Vargas, D.P., de Souza, A.N.M., Rosado Júnior, A.G., Tonetto, C.J., Nörnberg, J.L. 2018, Meat Science
 

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