Introduction

The U.S. Department of Labor and the State of Nevada Department of Employment, Training and Rehabilitation develop biennial projections of the aggregate economy, labor force, and industry and occupational employment. In prior projections, each occupation was assigned to 1- of-11 training or education categories based on the occupation’s most significant source of education and training. The assigned category was judged to represent the best avenue for entrance and ultimate success in the occupation.

Nevada Employment 2004-2014

Bar graph of nevada employment in 2004 to 2014 to show that short-term on-the-job training has the highest

Source: Nevada Demand Occupations 2004-2014, Nevada Workforce Informer, 2007

Data From Nevada Employment

Employment

In 2006, approximately 67% of workers in Nevada were employed in occupations that generally required on-thejob training. More than 60% of this training could be achieved in less than one year (moderate or short term). 42% of these jobs required less than one month of training. Jobs requiring this level of training are expected to grow approximately 41% to 48% between 2004 and 2014. While the majority of jobs in Nevada required some form of on-the-job training, only 14% required workers to have a bachelor’s degree or higher.

An adequately trained workforce is essential for successful economic development, which benefits business, government and labor. Understanding current and future demand for skilled labor, economic development, workforce and education agencies can target resources to meet this demand for targeted occupations. This fact sheet investigates current and projected growth in occupation by education and training from a national and state of Nevada perspective.

Additionally, approximately 4% of these jobs required work experience in addition to the degree. Jobs requiring this level of training are expected to grow approximately 46% to 55% between 2004 and 2014.

Nationally in 2006, approximately 63 percent of workers were employed in occupations that generally required onthe- job training. More than 55% of this training could be achieved in less than one year (moderate or short term). Thirty-five percent of these jobs required less than one month of training. Jobs requiring this level of training are expected to grow approximately 8% to 11% between 2004 and 2014. While the majority of jobs in the United States required some form of on-the-job training, only 20% of jobs required workers to have a bachelor’s degree or higher. Additionally, approximately 4% of these jobs required work experience in addition to the degree. Jobs requiring this level of training are expected to grow approximately 16% to 31% between 2004 and 2014.

United States Employment 2004-2014

Bar graph of United States Employment from 2004 to 2014 to show that short-term on -the-job training has the highest

Source: Occupational Projections and Training Data 2004-2005 edition, US Bureau of Labor Statistics

Data From United States Employment

Job Growth

Between 2004 and 2014, Nevada’s job growth rate (42.7%) is expected to outpace the national job growth rate (13.0%). In Nevada, jobs requiring associate degrees are predicted to grow the fastest. Jobs requiring moderate-term on-the-job training are expected to grow the slowest. Nationally, jobs requiring a doctoral degree are expected to grow the fastest. Jobs requiring moderate-term on-the-job training are forecasted to grow the slowest.

Job Growth Rate 2004-2014

Bar graph of the job growth rate in 2004 to 2014 to show that associate degree was the highest in Nevada and doctoral degree in the United States

Source: Nevada Demand Occupations 2004-2014, Nevada Workforce Informer, 2007; Occupational Projections and Training Data 2004-2005 edition, US Bureau of Labor Statistics

Data From Job Growth Rate

Job Openings

Between 2004 and 2014, Nevada’s economy is predicted to have nearly 600,000 job openings because of growth or replacements. The majority (64%) of these openings will be due to growth. Of these total openings, more than 400,000 will require some on-the-job training with most openings needing less than a month of training. It is interesting to note that while almost half of all job openings will require short-term on-the-job training, this class of jobs has the lowest percentage of growth openings with just 55% of total openings due to growth.

In contrast, openings requiring a professional degree account for less than 1% of total openings, but these jobs have the highest percentage of growth openings relative to total openings, at 76%.

Nevada Job Openings 2004-2014

Bar graph of the nevada job openings in 2004 to 2014 to show that short-term on-the-job training is the highest

Source: Nevada Demand Occupations 2004-2014, Nevada Workforce Informer, 2007

Data From Nevada Job Openings

Between 2004 and 2014, the U.S. economy is predicted to have more than 53.2 million job openings because of growth or replacements. In contrast to Nevada, the majority (64%) of these openings will be due to replacement. Of these total openings, more than 33 million will require some on-the-job training with most openings needing less than a month of training. It is interesting to note that while almost half of all job openings will require short-term on-the-job training, this class of jobs has the lowest percentage of growth openings with just 27% of total openings due to growth. In contrast, openings requiring a doctoral degree account for less than 2% of total openings, but these jobs have the highest percentage of growth openings relative to total openings at 58%.

United States Job Openings 2004-2014

Bar graph of United States Job Openings in 2004 to 2014 to show that short-term on-the-job training is  the highest

Source: Occupational Projections and Training Data 2004-2005 edition, US Bureau of Labor Statistics

Data From United States Job Openings

Wages

Generally, jobs requiring higher levels of education and experience tend to pay higher entry-level and median wages. Nationally, jobs requiring a professional or doctoral degree pay the highest wages, while jobs needing only moderate or short-term training pay the lowest entrylevel and median wages. In Nevada, wages for jobs requiring only moderate or short-term training follow the same trend as the United States. However, the pay for jobs needing moderate training was higher in Nevada than the United States. Surprisingly, occupations requiring a doctoral degree in Nevada have lower entry-level and median wages than occupations requiring much lower levels of education.

2006 Annual Entry Level Wages

Bar graph of the annual entry level wages in 2006 to show that professional degree is the highest

Source: Occupational Employment and Wage Estimates for Nevada and the United States, US Bureau of Labor Statistics, May 2006

Data From Annual Entry Level Wages

In general, occupations requiring advanced training or education have higher earning potential as workers move from entry-level work to more experienced work. In the United States, occupations requiring a bachelor’s degree or higher led to wage gains of more than $20,000. In Nevada, occupations with the potential for wage gains of $20,000 or more require a professional degree, bachelor’s degree, or an advanced degree with work experience. Both nationally and in Nevada, only jobs requiring short-term training led to wage gains of less than $10,000. Also, for the state of Nevada and the United States, jobs that require college training are among the highest paid and fastest growing.

2006 Annual Median Wages

Bar graph of the annual median wages in 2006 to show that professional degree is the highest

Source: Occupational Employment and Wage Estimates for Nevada and the United States, US Bureau of Labor Statistics, May 2006

Data From Annual Median Wages

Conclusion

A well-trained workforce is necessary for economic growth. Policymakers can use this information to ensure that future workers have the necessary skills and training to meet the demand for targeted occupations.

Nevada Employment 2004-2014
Category 2004 Projected 2014
Short-term on-the-job training 358,638 508,563
Moderate-term on-the-job training 151,363 214,128
Long-term on-the-job training 70,103 103,985
Work experience in a related occupation 58,629 83,410
Postsecondary vocational training 59,929 88,770
Associate degree 24,862 39,457
Bachelor's degree 69,748 106,697
Bachelor's or higher degree, plus work experience 32,920 49,072
Master's degree 5,376 8,354
Doctoral degree 2,097 3,182
Professional degree 7,612 11,171
United States Employment 2004-2014
Category 2004 Projected 2014
Short-term on-the-job training 51,778,000 57,699,000
Moderate-term on-the-job training 28,948,000 31,421,000
Long-term on-the-job training 11,020,000 11,980,000
Work experience in a related occupation 11,062,000 12,119,000
Postsecondary vocational training 7,917,000 9,316,000
Associate degree 5,412,000 6,770,000
Bachelor's degree 17,043,000 20,378,000
Bachelor's or higher degree, plus work experience 6,500,000 7,582,000
Master's degree 2,148,000 2,552,000
Doctoral degree 1,939,000 2,535,000
Professional degree 1,850,000 2,202,000
Job Growth Rate 2004-2014
Category Nevada United States
Short-term on-the-job training 41.8% 11.4%
Moderate-term on-the-job training 41.5% 8.5%
Long-term on-the-job training 48.3% 8.7%
Work experience in a related occupation 42.3% 9.6%
Postsecondary vocational training 48.1% 17.7%
Associate degree 58.7% 25.1%
Bachelor's degree 53.0% 19.6%
Bachelor's or higher degree, plus work experience 49.1% 16.6%
Master's degree 55.4% 18.9%
Doctoral degree 51.7% 30.6%
Professional degree 46.8% 19.2%
Overall 42.7% 13.0%
Nevada Job Openings 2004-2014
Category Openings due to Growth and Replacement
Short-term on-the-job training 268,537
Moderate-term on-the-job training 91,716
Long-term on-the-job training 48,493
Work experience in a related occupation 36,856
Postsecondary vocational training 43,258
Associate degree 19,223
Bachelor's degree 50,056
Bachelor's or higher degree, plus work experience 22,067
Master's degree 3,964
Doctoral degree 1,586
Professional degree 4,698
United States Job Openings 2004-2014
Category Openings due to Growth and Replacement
Short-term on-the-job training 21,564,196
Moderate-term on-the-job training 8,422,408
Long-term on-the-job training 3,216,485
Work experience in a related occupation 3,368,938
Postsecondary vocational training 2,959,414
Associate degree 2,386,083
Bachelor's degree 6,539,181
Bachelor's or higher degree, plus work experience 2,284,210
Master's degree 840,987
Doctoral degree 1,029,321
Professional degree 634,836
2006 Annual Entry Level Wages
Category Nevada United States
Short-term on-the-job training $15, 991 $16, 112
Moderate-term on-the-job training $23, 650 $19, 953
Long-term on-the-job training $26, 397 $23, 213
Work experience in a related occupation $32, 473 $27, 567
Postsecondary vocational training $22, 568 $21, 882
Associate degree $34, 991 $28, 267
Bachelor's degree $32, 226 $33, 893
Bachelor's or higher degree, plus work experience $43, 591 $39, 281
Master's degree $35, 116 $31, 823
Doctoral degree $31, 843 $41, 522
Professional degree $69, 713 $54, 865
2006 Annual Median Wages
Category Nevada United States
Short-term on-the-job training $23, 654 $23, 704
Moderate-term on-the-job training $36, 014 $31, 487
Long-term on-the-job training $43, 531 $38 ,600
Work experience in a related occupation $49, 845 $46, 718
Postsecondary vocational training $37, 057 $35, 430
Associate degree $51, 767 $45, 008
Bachelor's degree $52, 338 $57, 303
Bachelor's or higher degree, plus work experience $70, 250 $70, 445
Master's degree $53, 778 $54, 493
Doctoral degree $49, 450 $76, 229
Professional degree $111, 200 $95, 205
Harris, T. 2008, Future Demand for Education and Training in Nevada and the United States: 2004-2014, Extension, University of Nevada, Reno FS-2008

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