Babbs, C. 2000, Herbs for Many Uses, Extension, University of Nevada, Reno IP-2000

THESE HERBS SOW THEMSELVES

Many herbs are so easy to grow that they’ll practically plant themselves. You need to sow or transplant them into the garden the first year and then let a few of each kind go to seed. The seeds will fall and germinate the following spring. Some seedlings may pop up in the most unexpected places. Enjoy the informal effect, or transplant the young seedlings to where you want them to grow. Here are some of the most dependable self-sowers:

  • Agrimony
  • Borage
  • Caraway
  • Chervil
  • Dill
  • Coriander/Cilantro
  • Epazote
  • Fennel
  • German chamomile
  • Lemon basil
  • Roman chamomile

SOME HERBS JUST CAN’T BE GROWN FROM SEED

  • French tarragon
  • Peppermint
  • Italian oregano (also called hardy marjoram)

THE BEST HERBS TO BRING INDOORS

Bringing herbs indoors is a great way to brighten up those dull winter days. It’s also a necessity if you want to over winter frost-tender herbs, such as scented geraniums and bay. Most herbs prefer a bright, airy spot with a temperature between 50 degrees and 70 degrees F. Keep the soil evenly moist, and provide a good level of humidity by grouping pots together and setting them on shallow trays filled with wet gravel. Here are some herbs that usually adapt well to indoor culture: Basil Bay, Catnip, Chervil, Chives, Coriander/Cilantro, Elfin herb, Myrtle, Oregano Patchouli, Rosemary, Sages, Summer savory, Sweet marjoram and Sented geraniums.

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