Titles are NOT capitalized when they follow a name, except for those words that are proper nouns, such as "Extension," and the name of a specific county, such as "Douglas County." Titles ARE capitalized when used before a name.

Examples of titles after a name:

  • Steve Lewis, Douglas County Extension educator with University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
  • Sherm Swanson, range specialist with University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
  • Heidi Kratsch, horticulturist (or horticulture specialist) with University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
  • Mary Wilson, nutritionist (or nutrition specialist) with University of Nevada Cooperative Extension

Examples of titles before a name:

  • Douglas County Extension Educator Steve Lewis with University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
  • Range Specialist Sherm Swanson with University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
  • Horticulture Specialist Heidi Kratsch with University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
  • Nutrition Specialist Mary Wilson with University of Nevada Cooperative Extension
Extension 2019, Titles and How to Use Them, Extension
 

Also of Interest:

 
children learning about ember awareness
Attend Nevada Field Day to learn about Cooperative Extension and other University programs
Attend Nevada Field Day to learn about Cooperative Extension programs
Fisher, J. 2018, Reno Gazette Journal
A wildfire burns brush near a cluster of homes with text: How to Complete a Community Wildfire Protection Plan for Nevada Communities
How to Complete a Community Wildfire Protection Plan for Nevada Communities
A Community Wildfire Protection Plan (CWPP) describes the wildfire hazards and mitigation measures for a community. Completing and implementing a CWPP is an important means for residents of Nevada’s wildfire prone areas to address the wildfire threat.
Smith, E., Sistare, S. 2013, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, SP-13-14
A bundle of cheatgrass in front of a house
Be Careful! Cheatgrass is extremely flammable!
Dry cheatgrass is one of the most easily ignitable substances on Nevada's rangelands. It is the kindling that fuels many of our wildfires. Once ignited, cheatgrass fires can travel very fast. Be careful! Be prepared!
Smith, Ed, Davison, Jay 2008, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno SP-05-08
Thinning and Sanitation: Tools for the management of bark beetles in the Lake Tahoe Basin
From 1994 to 1996, five interstate forest fires in eastern Sierra Nevada forests chronically infested with bark beetles claimed $40 million in housing and property damage, timber loss, and soil stabilization costs.
Donaldson, S., Seybold, S.J. 1998, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, FS-98-42
The Angora Fire burns hillsides across Lake Tahoe. Smoke plumes in the air.
Fire Adapted Communities: The Next Step in Wildfire Preparedness. Lake Tahoe Basin
There are proven steps that homeowners can take to improve personal safety and home survival during wildfire. The purpose of this publication is to present these steps and encourage neighbors to work together and with their local fire firefighting agency to take action.
Smith, E., Sistare, S. 2014, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, SP-14-05