Jamie Roice-Gomes

Photo of Jamie Roice-Gomes, Extension

Jamie Roice-Gomes

Living With Fire Manager

Summary

Jamie is responsible for managing the daily operations with the Living With Fire Program as they relate to community outreach, including marketing and promoting events, the volunteer program, communication with community and program partners, tracking results and project deliverables.

Education

B.S. University of Nevada, 2007
M.A. University of Nevada, 2011

Programs

living with fire cb

Living With Fire

Helping Nevadans and visitors prepare for wildfire

News & Journal Articles, Fact Sheets, Reports...

Fact Sheets
Combine Defensible Space and Best Management Practices (BMP's)
Homeowners at Lake Tahoe need to protect their homes from wildfire. At the same time, they are required to protect Lake Tahoe’s famed water clarity from sediment caused by soil erosion. These goals can be accomplished most efficiently if owners plan their defensible space and their best management practices together.
Cobourn, John 2008, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, FS-08-26
Firescaping: Landscape design for defensible space
Firescaping is landscape design that reduces house and property vulnerability to wildfire. The goal is to develop a landscape with a design and choice of plants that offer the best defensible space and enhance the property.
Skelly, JoAnne 2001, Extension, University of Nevada, Reno, FS-01-33
Thinning and Sanitation: Tools for the management of bark beetles in the Lake Tahoe Basin
From 1994 to 1996, five interstate forest fires in eastern Sierra Nevada forests chronically infested with bark beetles claimed $40 million in housing and property damage, timber loss, and soil stabilization costs.
Donaldson, S., Seybold, S.J. 1998, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, FS-98-42
Greenstrips: Another Tool to Manage Wildfire
Greenstrips can be used to reduce the opportunity for man-caused fires to start or spread. They can reduce the size of wildfires and increase the effectiveness of the fire fighting effort, which reduces the cost. Greenstrips are also used to protect high value natural resources,
Davidson, J., Smith E. 1997, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, FS-97-36
What Grows Back After The Fire
In the aftermath of wildfire, many homeowners are alarmed by the sudden change in appearance of the wildland vegetation surrounding their homes. At this time, a frequently asked question is "Will it grow back?" This fact sheet describes the response of some common northern Nevada rangeland plants to wildfire.
Smith, E., Davidson, J. 1996, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno. FS96-40
Informational Publications
The Governer of Nevada signing a multi-state proclamation with support of Nevadans around him.
Nevada Wildfire Awareness Month County Proclamation Wording
Customize your county proclamation in support of Nevada Wildfire Awareness Month- May 2020.
Roice-Gomes, J. 2020, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, IP-20
A row of black and white houses with a wildfire approaching in the background. Text saying: Wildfires Happen. Is your community prepared?
Summary Report Nevada Wildfire Awareness Month 2019
Nevada Wildfire Awareness Month (NWAM) 2019 was held May 1–31, with events and activities taking place throughout the state. With the collaboration of partnering agencies, the Living With Fire program educated Nevada residents on minimizing the wildfire impact on communities by taking proactive steps to prepare.
Roice-Gomes, J., Thom, A. 2019, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, IP 2019
Lay or Popular Publications
Men loading juniper bushes into a truck
What did we learn from the Caughlin Fire?
Jamie Roice-Gomes and Ashley Andrews break down 5 lessons learned following the Caughlin Fire
Andrews, A. and Roice-Gomes, J. 2019, Nevada Today
Special Publications
Choosing the Right Plants for Northern Nevada's High Fire Hazard Areas - Lake Tahoe Basin
The latest version has been revised to indicate which plants in this publication are also included on the “TRPA Recommended Native and Adapted Plant List” and which are on the suggested “Accent Plant Guide for Lake Tahoe” list.
Skelly, J., Smith, Ed. 2017, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, SP-17-01
Burning house
Fire Adapted Communities: The Next Step in Wildfire Preparedness - Elko County
Elko County has more rural communities located in high- and extreme-wildfire hazard areas than anywhere else in Nevada. University of Nevada, Reno Extension; and Elko County have come together to promote the Fire Adapted Community concept. They believe that this is the best response to our wildfire threat.
Smith, E., Sistare, S., Nejedlo, G 2016, Extension | Univerisity of Nevada, Reno, SP-16-02
Burning house
Fire Adapted Communities: The Next Step in Wildfire Preparedness - Storey County
Faced with the growing potential for loss of human life and property due to wildfire, Nevada’s local, state and federal firefighting agencies, Nevada Fire Safe Council, University of Nevada Cooperative Extension and Storey County government have come together to promote the Fire Adapted Communities concept.
Smith, E., Sistare, S., Nejedlo, G 2011, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, SP-11-07
Fire Adapted Communities: The Next Step in Wildfire Preparedness, Elko County
Do you know what it takes to survive a wildfire? A fire adapted community is a community located in fire-prone area that requires little assistance from firefighters during a wildfire. Read more about fire adapted communities in the Elko County area.
Smith, E., Sistare, S., Nejedlo, G. 2011, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, SP-16-02
Choosing Turf and Erosion Control Grasses for the Lake Tahoe Basin
Planting grass near homes can control soil erosion and help create fire defensible space. Since the tragic Angora Fire in 2007, many Tahoe residents are re-evaluating their landscaping options for areas close to residences.
Cobourn, J., Skelly, J. 2009, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, SP-09-07
Choosing the Right Plants for Northern Nevada's High Fire Hazard Areas
The most important person in preventing a house from being destroyed by wildfire is the homeowner. And, it is the actions that a homeowner takes before a fire occurs that are critical. One of the most important “pre-fire” activities that a homeowner can do is the creation of a defensible space.
Smith, E., Skelly, J. 2007, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno, EB-07-01