Nevada's domestic violence rates are some of the highest in the nation. Needs assessments in Elko and Churchill Counties showed that domestic violence prevention is a high-priority issue. Children living in violent homes are at greater risk for abuse. Research shows that as children witness violence at home, they develop attitudes about violence and power in relationships that can pass to future generations. Children who witness violence also experience problems as adults, such as depression, anxiety, trauma-related symptoms, and increased tolerance for and use of violence in relationships.

Extension's Heart & Hope: Family Violence Prevention Program, led by Extension Educator Jill Baker-Tingey, works to spread awareness and prevent violence in Elko County in three ways:

  1. Prevention education for surviving families
  2. Community education
  3. Law enforcement training

Building Hope for the Future

A family violence prevention program for families who have previously experienced domestic violence

The Heart & Hope program provides parents and children with resources and skills to strengthen family relationships and build resilience. Parent survivors of former domestic violence and their children ages birth -18 may be eligible to participate. This nine-week education program includes a light meal, separate skill building activities for adults and children, and family activities to practice skills together. Program topics include communication, emotions, problem-solving, healthy relationships, stress management and more. For information, contact Julie Woodbury at 775-340-8360 or woodburyj@unce.unr.edu.

Program Purpose: To provide parent and child survivors of past domestic violence with resources and skills to strengthen family relationships.

Program Goal: To decrease domestic violence in our community.

Heart & Hope Family Violence Prevention Program meets weekly for 9 weeks, two times per year (in the fall and in the spring)

Each workshop includes:

  • Welcome
  • Family meals
  • Separate parent, teen, youth and children’s meetings
  • Family –based activities
  • Take-home activities

Workshop Topics:

  • Adults
    • Teambuilding
    • Communication
    • Child development
    • Parenting styles
    • Guidance
    • Emotions
    • Problem-solving
    • Healthy relationships
    • Strengthening families
  • Children, Youth, Teens
    • Teambuilding
    • Communication
    • Self-efficacy
    • Feelings
    • Feelings
    • Empathy
    • Problem-solving
    • Friendship skills
    • Strengthening families

Who can participate in Heart & Hope?

  • Adult and child survivors of past domestic violence
  • Additional groups may include:
    • Adults who have custody of children who have been exposed to domestic violence
    • Parents who were exposed to domestic violence as children

Building strong families

Families engage in nurturing and trust-building activities that encourage positive family interactions.

Encouraging positive relationships

Children, youth and teens participate in activities geared for their age. Children, birth to 3 years, play, read books and sing together. Children, ages 4-8 years, learn about feelings, solve problems and play with new friends. Youth, ages 9-12, and teens, ages 13-18, learn to communicate respectfully, use tools to calm down, make good decisions and build healthy relationships.

Moving forward

Kids learn to recognize and manage feelings, build positive friendships, make good decisions, care about others and solve problems.

I was so lost before this program. I felt like a failure of a woman and mother. This program has helped me regain my sanity and confidence that I can do this.” – Heart & Hope parent


Having fun together

Group activities and Family Night Out events provide opportunities for parents and kids of all ages to have fun together, learn positive skills for family interaction and encourage curiosity and imagination.

"The different topics helped my family grow closer and healthier together." -Heart and Hope participant


Learning new skills

Parents learn to actively listen and communicate with family members, reduce stress, calmly solve problems, maintain healthy relationships and guide children, youth and teens.

My family has really enjoyed coming to class each week and learning new tools. This class has brought my family closer together. We are much more aware of how we treat each other.” – Heart & Hope parent



Connecting with others

Families engage in fun activities to help build supportive networks, learn about community resources and make new friends with other families in the program.

It has taught me how to deal with stressful situations, the power of communication, and the importance of family time.” – Heart & Hope parent



Planning for a positive future

Parent survivors and their children who have experienced domestic violence gain skills to strengthen their family

Contact Heart & Hope Today

 
News Articles, Fact Sheets, Reports...
Heart & Hope Frequently Asked Questions
Frequently asked questions of the Heart & Hope domestic violence program
Baker-Tingey, J. 2021, Extension, University of Nevada, Reno, Blog Post
Heart & Hope Law Enforcement Training
Details regarding law enforcement training for the Heart & Hope domestic violence program.
Baker-Tingey, J. 2021, Extension, University of Nevada, Reno, Blog Post
Woman leaning against a wall with her head down
The hard truth about domestic violence
Intimate partner violence doesn't discriminate. It can happen to anyone. Learn more about its impacts on victims, survivors and the economy, and find local and national resources.
Andrews, A. 2019, Nevada Today
The Medical Cost of Domestic Violence
What is typically igonored is the financial cost domestic violence places on society, in terms of housing, child care, employment and criminal justice services
C. Powell, P. Powell, J. Baker-Tingey 2018, Extension | University of Nevada, Reno FS-18-02

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Learn more about the program's team

Jill Baker-Tingey
Program Leader & Contact
 

Extension Director's Office | On the campus of University of Nevada, Reno